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Multiple Sclerosis Health Center

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Multiple Sclerosis and Bladder Control Problems

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Bladder Control Treatments in MS continued...

Absorbent products such as mini-shields that attach to underwear or plastic-backed diapers.These items help you guard against accidents. Most of them are disposable, but you can also buy absorbent cloths that you can wash and reuse.

Medications. If behavior changes don’t work, your doctor may prescribe medicines to help with bladder control. You might also take them while you keep up your behavior training.

These drugs help control muscle movements that force urine out of the bladder:

Mechanical aids such as:

  • Catheters: Your doctor can put this thin, flexible, hollow tube through your urethra, the tube through which pee leaves your body, and into your bladder to drain urine.
  • Urethral insert: A thin, flexible solid tube in the urethra that blocks the flow of leaking urine.
  • External urethral barrier: A self-adhesive patch you can put over the opening where urine comes out.

Surgery. Doctors usually recommend an operation only as a last resort when other treatments haven’t worked.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Neil Lava, MD on April 13, 2014
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