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Multiple Sclerosis Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Multiple Sclerosis

  1. Multiple Sclerosis (MS) - Cause

    The cause of multiple sclerosis (MS) is unknown. Because a person's risk of MS is slightly higher when a relative (especially a parent, sister, or brother) has MS, there may be a genetic link.

  2. Multiple Sclerosis: Alternative Treatments - Topic Overview

    There is no cure for multiple sclerosis (MS). So far, the only treatments proved to affect the course of the disease are disease-modifying medicines, such as interferon beta. Other types of treatment should not replace these medicines if you are a candidate for treatment with them.Some people who have MS report that alternative treatments have worked for them. This may be in part due to the placebo effect. The placebo effect means that you feel better after getting treatment, even though the treatment has not been proved to work. Some complementary therapies may help relieve stress, depression, fatigue, and muscle tension. And some may improve your overall well-being and quality of life.Some people think that certain things may increase the risk of having an attack of MS, including:Dietary deficiencies.Sensitivity to foods and environmental toxins (including mercury amalgam in dental work).Sensitivity to stress and trauma.Viral infection while at a young age that causes a permanent,

  3. Multiple Sclerosis: Medicines for Depression - Topic Overview

    Depression is the most common mental health problem in people who have multiple sclerosis (MS). It may result from having a chronic disease or may be a side effect of certain MS medicines,such as interferon betas. Depression may be treated with: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs),such as fluoxetine (Prozac) or sertraline (Zoloft). These medicines may also make the person more ...

  4. Multiple Sclerosis: Bladder Problems - Topic Overview

    A person with multiple sclerosis (MS) may have difficulty emptying the bladder completely, because the muscle that helps to retain urine cannot relax (a form of spasticity).Sometimes urination can be stimulated by pressing or tapping the bladder area or by straining. Medicines can also help in some cases, including propantheline, oxybutynin (for example, Ditropan), or tolterodine (Detrol).When these methods or medicines do not help, you may have to use a urinary catheter, a thin flexible tube that you can insert into the channel through which urine exits the body (urethra). This is called intermittent self-catheterization. A little instruction and a few practice sessions with a nurse are all that are needed to learn to do intermittent self-catheterization. The procedure is usually done at the toilet.The technique provides immediate relief of symptoms and helps prevent urinary tract infections and their complications.Some people who have MS may only need to use the technique for a few

  5. Multiple Sclerosis (MS) - What Happens

    Generally, MS follows one of four courses: Relapsing - remitting, where symptoms may fade and then recur at random for many years. The disease does not advance during the remissions.

  6. Multiple Sclerosis Progression - Topic Overview

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects different people in different ways. For people who have only mild symptoms from time to time,the disease may not have much impact on their everyday lives. People with more severe MS have frequently recurring or ongoing symptoms and may become disabled within a few years. Most people with MS are between these extremes. For them,MS involves a series of attacks ...

  7. Multiple Sclerosis: Questions About What to Expect - Topic Overview

    Finding out that you have multiple sclerosis (MS) can be frightening. Even if you know a lot about MS,it is hard to predict how the disease will affect you. Some questions you might ask include the following: Will I have to use a wheelchair? MS affects how nerves in your brain and spinal cord communicate with each other. If your MS attacks the nerves that control your muscles (especially in ...

  8. Evoked Potential Test for Multiple Sclerosis

    An evoked potential test measures the time it takes for nerves to respond to stimulation. The size of the response is also measured. Nerves from different areas of the body may be tested. Types of responses are:Visual evoked response or potential (VER or VEP), which is when the eyes are stimulated by looking at a test pattern.Auditory brain stem evoked response or potential (ABER or ABEP), which .

  9. Multiple Sclerosis: Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) - Topic Overview

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is a medicine often used to boost the body's immune system and make it better able to fight disease. It is made from donated blood fluids. Treatment with IVIG may improve function and lengthen the time before a relapse in people who have relapsing-remitting MS. 1 It does not seem to help slow the progression of MS. 2 IVIG can also lengthen the time before a ...

  10. Multiple Sclerosis (MS) - Topic Overview

    Information on multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic neurological disease that involves the central nervous system-specifically the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves.

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