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Published as a special resource from the Nancy Davis Foundation for MS and WebMD.

MS Forum Panellists With Multiple Sclerosis

Nancy Davis

Nancy Davis, one of five children, was born and raised in Denver, Colorado. In 1987 she moved to California and now resides in Los Angeles. Nancy is an active individual with an incredible zest for life. She skis, plays tennis, has a black belt in karate, exercises, and travels – living her life to the fullest. She is an extremely dedicated philanthropist, author of Lean On Me and most importantly, she is a full-time mother who is devoted to her five children. Nancy was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis at the young age of 33. She decided that she was too young and too busy to let the disease slow her down. After being told by doctors that she was “lucky” that she could afford live-in assistance when the disease progressed and she became homebound – she was determined to devote her time, relationships and resources to finding a cure. Nancy’s hope, courage and strength continue to inspire her to maintain a vibrant quality of life despite this chronic disease, but most of all, she remains positive, continues to live her life to the fullest and is tireless in her efforts to finding the cure for MS. 

Janice Dean

Janice Dean is best known for talking about the weather but, the always bubbly Dean, who can be seen most days on the FOX News Channel has become a champion for people living with MS.  She has had an extensive career in Radio and Television Broadcasting from Canada to New York.  Janice is a member of the American Meteorological Society and was awarded the AMS Seal of Approval in 2009.  Janice, diagnosed with MS in 2005, is married and the mother of two young sons.  When she was first diagnosed she thought her life was over. To get through the initial shock, Dean began reading books by Richard Cohen, husband of Today Show host Meredith Vieira; Teri Garr and Montel Williams, all of whom have detailed their own struggles with multiple sclerosis. She believes that with a positive attitude she and others can beat this disease.

Teri Garr

One of Hollywood's most popular players of the '70s and early '80s, Garr brought effervescence, crackerjack timing and an air of daffy neurosis to the girlfriends and working moms that she played.  Garr had MS symptoms as early as 1983, when she started to trip while jogging, her case was so unusual that she wasn't diagnosed until 1999.   Indefatigably upbeat, Teri, author, mother, actress and MS activist went public with her struggle in 2002, and she hasn’t looked back since. Now she’s a National Ambassador for the Multiple Sclerosis Society, a paid spokesperson for an MS medication, and a leading advocate for multiple sclerosis education and research. And while MS remains an often-baffling disease, one thing about Teri Garr is clear: Even in the face of a “speedbump” like MS, she certainly won’t be slowing down anytime soon.

Nancy Davis Foundation For MS

The foundation is dedicated to the treatment and ultimate cure of MS. Funding research is the core focus of the foundation. Their annual MS Forum & Expo on May 8th featured top MS doctors discussing the latest advances in MS research and patient care.