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Multiple Sclerosis Health Center

Vitamin D May Slow Multiple Sclerosis: Study

But whether MS patients should take supplements is subject of debate
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WebMD News from HealthDay

By Steven Reinberg

HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Jan. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D may slow the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS) and also reduce harmful brain activity, a new study suggests.

Correcting vitamin D deficiency early in the course of the disease is important, according to the report, published online Jan. 20 in JAMA Neurology.

But some experts say it's too soon to recommend giving vitamin D supplements to people with the central nervous system disorder.

"No one knows what the connection between MS and vitamin D is," said Nicholas LaRocca, vice president for health care delivery and policy research at the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. "What they suspect is that vitamin D has some effect on the immune system."

Also, what dose of the vitamin might be appropriate isn't clear, he said. "We don't know what a good level would be. There is no scientific consensus on a treatment protocol. We may get to that point eventually," LaRocca said.

However, the lead researcher of the study, Dr. Alberto Ascherio, a professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health, is convinced that vitamin D -- often called the "sunshine vitamin" -- can be a real benefit to MS patients.

"These findings, combined with previous evidence that vitamin D deficiency is a risk factor for MS, and [research on] the immunological effects of vitamin D strongly suggest that maintaining an adequate vitamin D status is important in the treatment of MS," he said.

In the study, vitamin D levels at the time of the first MS symptoms predicted the progression of the disease over the following five years, Ascherio said.

People with lower vitamin D levels -- below 50 nanomoles per liter (nmol/L) -- were more likely to develop new brain lesions and had a worse prognosis than those with higher levels, Ascherio said. "Individuals who present with symptoms suggesting MS should be screened for possible vitamin D deficiency, and this should be corrected by vitamin D supplementation," he said.

MS is a chronic, debilitating disease. In many cases, symptoms are mild, but sometimes people with MS become unable to walk, write or speak.

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