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Multiple Sclerosis Health Center

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Multiple Sclerosis Progression - Topic Overview

Multiple sclerosis (MS) affects different people in different ways. For people who have only mild symptoms from time to time, the disease may not have much impact on their everyday lives. People with more severe MS have frequently recurring or ongoing symptoms and may become disabled within a few years.

Most people with MS are between these extremes. For them, MS involves a series of attacks that cause symptoms. These attacks are called relapses, flares, or exacerbations. They may last for days or weeks and then partially or completely go away. Relapses may be mild or severe and tend to recur over a period of years. They may become worse and more frequent over time, with symptoms becoming more severe and disabling. For most people with MS, the disease follows a relapsing-remitting course, at least at first. In 8 to 9 out of 10 people with this type of MS, the relapsing-remitting phase lasts about 20 years.1

Recommended Related to Multiple Sclerosis

5 Things Your Loved One Isn’t Telling You About MS

If you have a significant other, friend, or relative with multiple sclerosis (MS), you might know about some of the physical problems that can come with the disease. But chances are, that’s only part of what your loved one deals with. MS can cause invisible symptoms that can be tricky to talk about. Here are five common problems that many people with MS face, though they might never tell you. “I can’t stand it when people say, 'I’m tired, too.'" For people with MS, fatigue is a regular...

Read the 5 Things Your Loved One Isn’t Telling You About MS article > >

A diagnosis of MS can be difficult to accept for the thousands of healthy, active people whom the disease strikes without warning. Though rarely life-threatening, MS has no cure. Most people live with the disease for decades. But many face increasing disability as they get older.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: March 12, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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