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A Doctor's 'People Skills' Affect Patients' Health

Comfortable relationship can be as beneficial as statins for heart problems, study finds

WebMD News from HealthDay

By Amy Norton

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, April 10, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A doctor's "bedside manner" seems to have a real effect on patients' health, a new research review suggests.

The review, of 13 clinical trials, found that when doctors were given training to hone their people skills, patients typically fared better in their efforts to lose weight, lower their blood pressure or manage pain.

Experts said the findings, reported online April 9 in the journal PLOS One, show that the doctor-patient relationship can have an impact on people's health.

The effects in these studies were small, but still "impressive," said Alan Christensen, a professor of psychology at the University of Iowa.

Christensen, who was not involved in the research, studies the issue of health care provider-patient relationships. He pointed out that many of the training programs in the studies included in the new review focused on fairly "general" skills -- such as maintaining eye contact with patients, and listening without interrupting.

So it's encouraging to see that these training programs translate into specific health benefits at all, according to Christensen.

"It's important to be able to demonstrate that clinicians can learn to change how they interact with patients, and that it affects health outcomes," he said.

Dr. Helen Riess, the senior researcher on the new study, agreed. "I think that intuitively, people think that if you have an open, caring relationship with your provider, that's beneficial."

But to really know if there are objective health effects, clinical trials are key, said Riess, who directs the empathy and relational science program at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.

For its review, she said her team chose only rigorous clinical trials that measured "hard outcomes," such as blood pressure changes -- as opposed to subjective experiences like patient satisfaction.

The researchers ended up with 13 clinical trials from around the world. In each, health providers -- most often doctors -- were randomly assigned to either stick with their usual care or have some kind of training on patient interaction. Some focused on building "warmth" and empathy, Riess said, while others taught providers specific techniques, like "motivational interviewing."

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