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4 Things Your Dentist Wants You to Do Now

Want to jump-start the health of your pearly whites? Start with these must-dos.
By
WebMD the Magazine - Feature
Reviewed by Eric Yabu, DDS

Are your pearly whites starting to look not so pearly? Maybe it's time to treat your teeth with a little respect. Paul Vankevich, DMD, an assistant professor of general dentistry at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, speaks for dentists everywhere when he lists four things you can do right now for a mouth that looks and feels fabulous.

Kick the habit. Need another person in your life to explain why you need to quit smoking? Talk to your dentist. The nicotine and tar in cigarettes are not only turning your teeth an unsightly shade of yellow, but they're eating away at your gums. Smoking creates a ripe environment for bacteria and plaque on your teeth and along the gum lines. And that harms tissue and eventually increases your risk of tooth loss. Tobacco chemicals can also cause mouth sores that could turn into cancer.

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Pay a visit. If you're prone to ditching the dentist, it turns out you're part of the roughly 50% of adults in the United States who don't see a dentist on a yearly basis because of "dentist- phobia," finances, or just plain neglect. Regular trips to the dentist can catch problems such as decay, gum disease, trauma, or cancer at an early stage when they're treatable -- and solutions are more affordable.

Brush right. Is your brushing technique below par? Maybe you don't brush often enough -- or worse, at all? It takes only about two minutes to properly clean your teeth and gums. Angle the brush 45 degrees toward your gum line, and use gentle, circular strokes. Make sure the bristles on the brush aren't bending; if they are, you're brushing too hard and wearing down your teeth and gums. Plaque is soft, Vankevich explains, and will brush away easily with light strokes.

Finesse flossing. Flossing is fundamental to keeping teeth and gums clean -- but only if you do it right. Snapping and popping your way through the process probably does more harm than good, causing friction on tissue and damage at the gum line. Instead, use about two inches of floss between your fingers, unroll a fresh section of floss for each tooth, and keep the floss tight against your tooth to break up plaque while leaving your gums in good shape.

The Truth About Sugar and Tooth Decay

Sugar has a bad reputation when it comes to teeth, and for good reason. It fuels bacteria and acid production in your mouth, causing plaque to form and eat away at your teeth and gums. Your chompers are hit with up to 20 minutes of acid production for every sugar-fest you indulge in, from sweetened coffee in the morning to ice cream at night.

The solution? It's all about sucrose discipline, explains Vankevich to help you avoid dental decay --a problem that 20% of people in the United States face every time they look in the mirror. Cut down on the sugar, and brush and floss twice a day to keep those pearly whites clean and acids under control.

Reviewed on February 15, 2010

How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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