Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Oral Care

Font Size
A
A
A

When Heat and Cold Hurt Your Teeth

Here's how to banish the pain of sensitive teeth.
By Elizabeth B. Krieger
WebMD Magazine - Feature
Reviewed by Eric Yabu, DDS

Perhaps you've taken a swig of a cold drink and winced in pain. Or inhaled on a chilly day and felt a jolt when the air hit your teeth. Maybe you found yourself unable to enjoy a cup of hot tea without a sharp ache punctuating each sip. If any of these situations sounds familiar, you probably have sensitive teeth.

The reasons for the discomfort are many, says Mark S. Wolff, DDS, PhD, a professor and chair of the Department of Cariology and Comprehensive Care at New York University College of Dentistry. First, the root structure of one or more teeth may have become exposed. Normally covered by gum tissue, this layer just underneath -- called dentin -- contains millions of tiny tubules (or tubes), each of which is connected to a nerve ending. It's when the tubules are left unprotected by gum recession or enamel erosion that problems arise. Receding gums, tooth grinding, a diet high in acidic beverages, and overaggressive brushing can all leave dentin exposed.

Recommended Related to Oral Health

Saliva and Your Mouth

Saliva is a clear, watery liquid made by several glands in your mouth area. Saliva is an important part of a healthy body. It is mostly made of water. But saliva also contains important substances that your body needs to digest food and keep your teeth strong. Saliva is important because it: Keeps your mouth moist and comfortable Helps you chew, taste, and swallow Fights germs in your mouth and prevents bad breath Has proteins and minerals that protect tooth enamel and prevent tooth...

Read the Saliva and Your Mouth article > >

Brushing too hard is a surprisingly big problem for a lot of people, Wolff says. "Harsh strokes wear away at the gum tissue as well as the tooth's enamel layer, leaving each dentin tubule vulnerable to whatever it comes in contact with -- hot, cold, soft, or hard."

Your favorite beverages can make a big difference, too. Anything with a high acid level -- sodas, coffee, tea, almost all juices, wine, and many popular energy drinks -- can worsen enamel erosion and discomfort. Carbonated water is OK, says Wolff, but watch out for flavored seltzer, which may have citric acid.

Dentin can also become irritated if you overuse tooth-whitening agents, which contain harsh ingredients to strip away stains. Unfortunately, they can also thin the enamel layer around dentin, exposing the tender tubules.

For severe sensitivity, talk to your dentist about bonding the problematic areas. This is essentially a very fine varnish your dentist applies to the tooth. It's not a permanent fix, though.

Find more articles, browse back issues, and read the current issue of "WebMD Magazine."

Reviewed on March 14, 2013

How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

Get the latest Oral Health newsletter delivered to your inbox!


or
Answer:
Never
(0)
Good
(1-3)
Better
(4-6)
Best
(7)

You are currently

Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

Start Over

Step:  of 

Today on WebMD

big smile
Article
Man grinding teeth
Article
 
Is Diabetes Affecting Your Mouth
Tool
how your mouth impacts your health
Slideshow
 

are battery operated toothbrushes really better
Video
bpa dental sealants
Video
 
Healthy Mouth Slideshow
Video
Young woman holding lip at dentists office
Video
 

15 myths and facts about cavities
Video
how healthy is your mouth
Video
 
elmo brushing teeth
fitVideo
5 ways to prevent diabetes dental problems
Video
 

WebMD Special Sections