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    Coping With Dental Phobia

    Going to the dentist is less painful than it used to be. So is talking to your dentist.
    By
    WebMD Magazine - Feature
    Reviewed by Eric Yabu, DDS

    Does the thought of succumbing to the dentist's chair send a jolt of anxiety through your body? When it comes to triggering a fear response, few things can set people off like an upcoming trip to the dentist.

    That fear can set in early. Threatening comments from a parent, such as "If you don't brush your teeth, you'll have to go to the dentist," can leave a lasting negative impression. More common, a painful experience at the dentist's office during childhood triggers anxiety that carries over into adulthood, says David Hershkowitz, DDS, associate chair of the Department of Cariology & Comprehensive Care at NYU. But today, "there's no need any longer for people to fear dental pain," Hershkowitz says. "Modern dentistry is virtually painless."

    Recommended Related to Oral Health

    What Your Dental Health Says About You

    It's easy to ignore the effects of poor oral hygiene because they're hidden in your mouth. But gum disease produces a bleeding, infected wound that's the equivalent in size to the palms of both your hands, says Susan Karabin, DDS, a New York periodontist and president of the American Academy of Periodontology. "If you had an infection that size on your thigh, you'd be hospitalized," Karabin says. "Yet people walk around with this infection in their mouth and ignore it. It's easy to ignore because...

    Read the What Your Dental Health Says About You article > >

    New Dental Tools and Products

    New dental tools have come a long way over the past few decades. Needles that inject numbing agents, for example, are super-thin compared with fatter versions of yesteryear. They are also disposable. Needles were once used over and over again and sterilized between patients, Hershkowitz says. Repeat use dulls a needle's point over time, causing more pain upon injection. Improved methods and tools also help dentists slow the rate at which medicine works its way into gums, easing discomfort from the pressure of the medication as it's quickly released from the syringe.

    Calming Dental Anxiety

    A host of medications and new products help reduce pain, too. Topical anesthetic gels and dental patches used to numb gums keep patients comfortable during injections and deep cleanings. Nitrous oxide ("laughing gas") relaxes patients during more involved procedures. So does intravenous conscious sedation, which eases pain and discomfort while keeping you awake with medications given through an intravenous line placed in either the hand or arm.

    And because a little distraction goes a long way, iPods for your listening pleasure, big-screen televisions, iPads, and virtual reality glasses that put your eyes and mind in another realm are common items in the modern dentist's office. So is calming décor -- fresh flowers, miniature waterfalls, and bright, inviting wall colors.

    To truly calm your fears, it never hurts to remember that inside the dentist's white coat is a person who cares as much about your comfort as your teeth. "Look at the doctor as someone who's also a friend," Hershkowitz says.

    How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

    Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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    Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

    Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

    SOURCES:

    American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

    This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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