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Do-It-Yourself Dentistry

Dental problem? You don't have to be MacGyver to save a lost filling or replace a crown.
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Gauging Gum Pain continued...

Howley agrees. "If there is swelling and bleeding around the gums, see a dentist as soon as possible because it may indicate something more serious," he says. "You may need antibiotics, or if there is an abscess, you may need to have it drained." This was exactly the case with my recent dental emergency.

The good news is that if you really need a dentist (as I did), "there are areas or facilities that you can visit over a weekend without necessarily waiting for your dentist," Sherer says. "Regional hospitals have dental residency programs and residents on calls and dental schools in the area have emergency facilities"

A root canal refers to damaged tissues in the tooth. If you suspect this is the issue, "keep cold and sweets away from the painful area," Howley says. "If you do this, the pain will typically go away, but if you also have sensitivity to heat, it's an indication of more serious problem." For example, "if you drink coffee and the tooth hurts even after stimulus is gone, this tends to indicate a problem with a nerve or that the tooth is dying or traumatized and you need to do something about it," he says. "It may be a simple as an antibiotic and Motrin, and sometimes it's as simple as keeping hot, sweet, and cold away until you can have it looked at by a dentist."

If you can't quite put your finger on the pain (literally or figuratively), go through a mental checklist to identify the culprit. "Is it a missing filling? A broken tooth? If so, you could try aspirin or ibuprofen. Is it gum related? If so, topical ointments may work," Howley says.

Make Your Own Dental Bag

While it's hard to plan for dental mishaps, it's a good idea to pack a small just-in-case bag replete with some tooth repair basics. It should contain:

  • Salt packets
  • Gauze
  • Q-tips (in case you want to swab the area)
  • Ibuprofen or another anti-inflammatory painkiller
  • A small container (if you lose a crown or piece)
  • A phone number of a dentist
  • A pack of sugar-free gum
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Reviewed on June 18, 2008

How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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