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    Gum Disease: Symptoms and Treatment

    By Rachel Reiff Ellis
    WebMD Feature

    Gums protect and support your teeth and the tissue that holds them to the bone. When they aren’t healthy, you risk loss of those pearly whites -- and damage to your overall health.

    How Gum Disease Happens

    It "usually starts in areas that you’re not brushing or keeping clean,” says Mark Ryder, DMD, chair of periodontology at the University of California, San Francisco School of Dentistry. “Bacteria build up in a film on your teeth and you get a reaction to that bacteria -- inflammation.”

    Swelling of the gums (also known as gingivitis), can be one of the first signs of gum disease. Other symptoms include:

    • Gum redness
    • Bleeding while brushing or flossing
    • Receding gum line
    • Loose teeth
    • Constant bad breath
    • Mouth sores

    Pain isn’t one of the first symptoms of gingivitis.

    “What’s unique about early gum disease is that it doesn’t cause much discomfort at all,” Ryder says. “So you really have to pay attention to these other symptoms.”

    Gum problems can get worse if you don’t get gingivitis treated.

    “Infection and inflammation will spread deeper into the tissues that support the tooth,” Ryder says. “When that happens, the inflammation becomes destructive.”

    The gums begin to pull away from the teeth, which lets in more bacteria. At this stage, gum disease is called periodontitis.

    That condition "causes the tissues and bone that support the teeth to break down,” Ryder says.

    This creates pockets where bacteria can grow.

    “As you lose bone, your teeth get looser and looser, and eventually, they fall out,” he says.

    What’s more, oral health affects your whole body. People with gum disease are more likely to get heart disease and are less able to control their blood sugar, studies show.

    The CDC found that 47% of adults older than 30 have periodontitis. After age 65, that number goes up to 70%.

    Your odds of getting gum disease are higher if you:

    • Use tobacco products
    • Are pregnant
    • Have a family history of gum disease
    • Have diabetes
    • Have high stress
    • Grind or clench your teeth

    Some birth control, antidepressants, and heart medicines may also raise your risk. Tell your dentist about any medications you take regularly.

    “Stop smoking, manage diabetes correctly, and if you’re pregnant, think about visiting the dentist more often during your pregnancy,” Ryder says.

    How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

    Number of Days Per Week I Floss

    Get the latest Oral Health newsletter delivered to your inbox!


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    You are currently

    Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

    Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

    SOURCES:

    American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

    This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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