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    Open Wide and Relax -- Really!

    From movies to massages -- pampering at the dentist's office is becoming more popular.

    More Reasons to Say "Aaahhh..." continued...

    Mark Tholen, DDS, attributes the interest in the spa model to a growing desire to build customer confidence. "If people walk into an office that is of high design and very aesthetically pleasing, they are going to have a higher level of trust than if they walk into a little Jack-in-the-box-type of place," he says.

    The dental trade has become more competitive in recent years, especially with the general improvements in public oral health. With fewer people being treated for tooth or gum disease and greater consumer demand to look and feel good, dentists have turned to cosmetic services, high-tech equipment, and enhanced customer service to keep business flowing.

    It's not unusual, for instance, for a dentist to sit down with a patient in a beautifully decorated consultation room with a 19-inch TV monitor displaying a digital image of what the patient would look like if she decided to surgically alter some part of her mouth.

    It is also not unheard of to have a dentist share space with another professional, such as a massage therapist or a plastic surgeon, and have patients use the services of each during one visit.

    Going Boutique

    The American Dental Association is aware of boutique clinics, but has not issued an official statement on the topic.

    One of the group's consumer advisers, Kimberly Harms, DDS, says the ADA's primary concern is that patients get the best oral healthcare possible. As long as the professionals involved are appropriately licensed, and everyone adheres to local and regional laws, the ADA sees no problem with it, and leaves such decisions to the individual dentist.

    Harms should know. She is Susan Barnes' dentist, and since the installation of spa-like features in her office, business has tripled. She has been practicing this type of dentistry for almost a decade, however, and hesitantly admits to being ahead of the curve. "I just thought of how I would want to be treated as a patient," she says.

    When asked whether the cost of spa-like services affects her dental fees, Harms says her family keeps up the office and gardens so there has not been much overhead to pass along to patients. Her situation may be unique, she confesses, adding that, "Typically, you get what you pay for."

    At some new boutique dental offices, that may mean a foot massage during a cleaning, a consultation with a plastic surgeon about getting Botox injections, cookies and a smile to go.

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    Reviewed on June 21, 2004

    How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

    Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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    You are currently

    Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

    Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

    SOURCES:

    American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

    This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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