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Oral Health: Insights Into Your Overall Health

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By Brenda Conaway
WebMD Feature
Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

If your eyes are the window to your soul, then your mouth is a mirror of your health. Although that idea may seem farfetched, health experts believe that good oral health care does more than prevent tooth decay and gum disease.

"Any disease related to the mouth has an impact elsewhere in the body," says Denis F. Kinane, BDS, PhD, at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

Recommended Related to Oral Health

What Your Dental Health Says About You

It's easy to ignore the effects of poor oral hygiene because they're hidden in your mouth. But gum disease produces a bleeding, infected wound that's the equivalent in size to the palms of both your hands, says Susan Karabin, DDS, a New York periodontist and president of the American Academy of Periodontology. "If you had an infection that size on your thigh, you'd be hospitalized," Karabin says. "Yet people walk around with this infection in their mouth and ignore it. It's easy to ignore because...

Read the What Your Dental Health Says About You article > >

Researchers are studying the association between oral health, inflammation, and disease. Inflammation, which is the body's response to infection, seems to play a key role in many health conditions, including heart disease, diabetes, and gum disease, also called periodontal disease. Scientists hope to understand how these diseases are interrelated, and whether treating the inflammation caused by gum disease can improve other diseases.

This is important research because about 30% to 50% of American adults have mild to moderate gum disease. Another 5% to 15% have more severe disease, according to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. And although genetics may increase your risk for gum disease, most cases can be controlled by brushing and flossing regularly.

Here's an overview of the latest research on the connection between oral health and overall health.

Inflammation and the Diseases of Aging: Where Gum Disease Fits In

"In recent years, there's been an interest in the medical community about the chronic diseases of aging and how inflammation in general seems to be the link, whether it's cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's, or diabetes," says Nadeem Karimbux, DMD, MMSc, assistant dean in the Office of Dental Education at Harvard School of Dental Medicine in Boston. "And periodontal disease fits right into this picture." Because gum disease can be hidden under the gums, it can easily be overlooked. Yet if you calculate the amount of inflammation around the gums in someone with moderate to severe gum disease, it would be equal in size to the palm of your hand, he says.

"If you imagine a person with diabetes walking around with a palm-sized inflammation on their skin, you'd want to jump in and treat it right away," Karimbux says. So why shouldn't you consider that gum inflammation, even though it's in the mouth, adds to the amount of inflammation a person has at any given time and is just another risk factor that connects all these diseases?

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How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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