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Gum Contouring

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Gum Contouring: What to Expect continued...

Before surgery, your doctor should go over what he or she will be doing during the procedure. Often, dentists will use a pen and draw a line to mark the new gum line. That way, you can see exactly how much gum will be removed or how the gum line will be reshaped.

A local anesthetic may be applied to numb the area. Sometimes, bone at the front of the tooth's root must also be removed during gum contouring to get the best long-term results.

Gum Contouring: Recovery

The day of surgery, you should rest and limit your activities. It may take a few days or weeks for your gums to heal completely. Your dentist will give you specific directions about what you need to do to aid the recovery process. Here are some general tips to get you through the recovery period:

  • Ease pain by taking an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as Tylenol or Advil, as directed by your dentist. Do not take aspirin, which can cause bleeding.
  • Eat soft, cool foods, such as eggs, pasta, yogurt, cottage cheese, soft vegetables, and ice cream, for the first few days after surgery. Avoid spicy foods and anything with seeds until your gums have healed completely.
  • Follow your dentist's directions on when and how to brush your teeth during the healing process.

If you notice excessive swelling or bleeding, or if you have any concerns following the procedure, call your dentist.

Gum Contouring: The Risks

No surgery is without risks. The risks associated with gum contouring include:

If you are unhappy with the way your teeth and gums look, talk to your dentist to see if gum contouring surgery is right for you. But remember, as with any cosmetic procedure, the end result depends on the skill of the doctor. Do not go to just anyone. Do your homework and make sure you are comfortable with the dentist's abilities. Ask the dentist what additional training he or she has had in cosmetic dentistry. Also, ask to see photos of the work he or she has done, and make sure you like what you see.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Steve Drescher, DDS on July 02, 2013
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Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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