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Peritonsillar Abscess

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Peritonsillar Abscess Treatment and Care at Home

There is no home treatment for peritonsillar abscess. Call your doctor for an immediate appointment to check your symptoms.

Medical Treatment for a Peritonsillar Abscess

If you have a peritonsillar abscess, the doctor's primary concern will be your breathing and airway. If your life is in danger because your throat is blocked, the first step may be to insert a needle in the pus pocket and drain away enough fluid so you can breathe comfortably.

If your life is not in immediate danger, the doctor will make every effort to keep the procedure as painless as possible. You will receive a local anesthetic (like at the dentist) injected into the skin over the abscess and, if necessary, pain medicine and sedation through an IV inserted in your arm. The doctor will use suction to help you avoid swallowing pus and blood.

  • The doctor has several options for treating you:
    • Needle aspiration involves slowly putting a needle into the abscess and withdrawing the pus into a syringe.
    • Incision and drainage involves using a scalpel to make a small cut in the abscess so pus can drain.
    • Acute tonsillectomy (having a surgeon remove your tonsils) may be needed if, for some reason, you cannot tolerate a drainage procedure, or if you have a history of frequent tonsillitis.
  • You will receive an antibiotic. The first dose may be given through an IV. Penicillin is the best drug for this type of infection, but if you are allergic, tell the doctor so another antibiotic can be used (other choices may be erythromycin or clindamycin).
  • If you are healthy and the abscess drains well, you can go home. If you are very ill, cannot swallow, or have complicating medical problems (such as diabetes), you may be admitted to the hospital. Young children, who often need general anesthesia for drainage, frequently require a hospital stay for observation.

Follow-Up for a Peritonsillar Abscess

Arrange follow-up with your doctor or an ear-nose-throat specialist (otolaryngologist) after treatment for a peritonsillar abscess. Also:

  • If the abscess starts to return, you may need a different antibiotic or further drainage.
  • If you develop excessive bleeding or have trouble breathing or swallowing, seek medical attention immediately.

 

Prevention of a Peritonsillar Abscess

There is no reliable method for preventing a peritonsillar abscess other than limiting risks: Do not smoke, maintain good dental hygiene, and promptly treat oral infections.

  • If you develop a peritonsillar abscess, you may possibly prevent peritonsillar cellulitis by taking an antibiotic. However, you should be closely monitored for abscess formation and may even be hospitalized.
  • If you are likely to form an abscess (for example, if you have tonsillitis frequently), talk with your doctor about whether you should have your tonsils removed.
  • As with any prescription, you must finish the full course of the antibiotic even if you feel better after a few days.

WebMD Medical Reference

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How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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