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Medical Reference Related to Oral Health

  1. Understanding Canker Sores -- the Basics

    Learn about canker sores from experts at WebMD.

  2. Jaw Problems: Managing Stress - Topic Overview

    There is a strong relationship between stress, muscle tension, and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). An overstressed mind can lead to an overstressed body. Excessive tension in your jaw muscles can force your jaw joint to move in an unnatural manner. Over time, you may damage the disc that cushions the TM joint, or you may wear down some of your teeth, forcing your jaw into an unnatural position.Manage stressLearn to recognize when stress is affecting your life, and find ways to relieve it. Exercise is an excellent way for your body to process stress in a healthy way.Relaxation skills and activities can make a big difference in how stress affects your body and mind.For tips, see the topic Stress Management. Also see the topic Mental Health Problems and Mind-Body Wellness.Emotional stress can be the result of:Sudden changes in your life, such as the loss of a loved one. Stress can also accompany positive changes, such as starting a new job.Problems at home or at work.Worrying about

  3. Temporomandibular Disorders: Dental Splints - Topic Overview

    Dental treatment is sometimes used to treat temporomandibular (TM) disorders. Splints (bite plates,mouth guards),which are custom-made by a dentist,fit between the upper and lower teeth. They may be used for short periods of time to ease muscle tension and stabilize the jaw. Splints are worn mostly at night,because people tend to clench or grind their teeth during sleep. In cases of disc ...

  4. Jaw Problems: Structural Problems and Injury - Topic Overview

    Problems in the structure of the jaw joint include: Problems in the bones or other structures of the joint. These may have been present since birth (congenital),developed over time,or been caused by injury. Problems with the disc that cushions the joint between the jawbone (mandible) and the skull,such as the disc moving out of its normal position (disc displacement) or tearing (usually the ...

  5. Temporomandibular Disorders: Medical History and Physical Exam - Topic Overview

    If a temporomandibular (TM) disorder is suspected,your dentist or primary care doctor will ask you to describe: Your jaw pain,including how long you have had it,whether you wake up with sore,stiff jaw muscles,and where you feel pain. Any recent change in the way your teeth fit together. Daily habits that may promote jaw pain-for example,whether your pain gets worse when you clench your ...

  6. Jaw Problems: Exercise and Relaxation - Topic Overview

    To help prevent or treat a temporomandibular disorder (TMD), you can try gentle jaw exercises. You can also try techniques that help you relax your jaw muscles.ExerciseTry a gentle exercise to restore normal range of motion, improve flexibility, and strengthen the jaw muscles. Your doctor, dentist, or physical therapist can recommend additional exercises.Do not do this exercise when your pain is severe or if it makes your pain worse.While watching yourself in a mirror, gently open and close your mouth, dropping your jaw straight up and down.Repeat for a few minutes each morning and night.Look for small improvements in the jaw's range of motion as you practice this exercise from day to day.RelaxationPaying attention to how you use your jaw can both prevent and help relieve symptoms. Good habits that help relax and rest your jaw include: Keep your teeth apart and your lips closed.Keep your tongue on the roof of your mouth, not between your teeth.Avoid things that make your jaw

  7. Understanding Strep Throat -- Prevention

    Read about strep throat prevention.

  8. Understanding Strep Throat -- The Basics

    Read basic information on strep throat.

  9. Diagnostic Arthroscopy for Temporomandibular Disorders - Topic Overview

    Arthroscopy may be used to diagnose a temporomandibular (TM) disorder when: The source of the symptoms can't be identified with other tests,and other treatment has not relieved pain. A surgeon needs to confirm the diagnosis of a joint problem before surgery. A health professional needs to see how the joint moves to make a diagnosis. ...

  10. Arthroscopy for Temporomandibular Disorders

    For arthroscopic jaw surgery, the surgeon inserts a pencil-thin, lighted tube (arthroscope) into the jaw joint through a small incision in the skin. The arthroscope is connected to a small camera outside the body that transmits a close-up image.

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How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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