Skip to content

Oral Care

Medical Reference Related to Oral Health

  1. Physical Therapy for Temporomandibular Disorders

    A physical therapist can develop a program for you that includes learning and practicing techniques for regaining normal jaw movement. The focus of physical therapy for temporomandibular (TM) disorders is relaxation, stretching, and releasing tight muscles and scar tissue. Physical therapy is an especially important part of recovery from TM joint surgery, as it helps minimize scar tissue ...

  2. Tonsillitis - What Increases Your Risk

    Close contact with an infected person is the main risk factor for tonsillitis.

  3. Preventing Tooth Decay in Young Children - Topic Overview

    Tooth decay, called dental caries, is caused by bacteria eating away the outer protective layer (enamel) of a tooth. Help prevent tooth decay in young children by adopting the following healthy habits:Take good care of your own teeth and gums. Saliva contains bacteria that cause tooth decay. Keep your own teeth and mouth healthy so you are less likely to transfer these bacteria to your baby. Avoid sharing spoons and other utensils with your baby. Also, don't clean your baby's pacifier with your mouth.Prevent prolonged contact with sugars in formula and breast milk. Remove a bottle from your baby's mouth before he or she falls asleep. This practice helps prevent mouth bacteria from producing acids that cause baby bottle tooth decay. Also, clean your baby's teeth after feeding, especially at night. Be smart about juice. Juice is not part of a healthy diet. Compared to a piece of fruit, fruit juice doesn't have the valuable fiber, it usually has more calories, and it is absorbed

  4. Canker Sores - Topic Overview

    What is a canker sore? A canker sore is a shallow sore shaped like a crater (ulcer) on your tongue or on the inside of your lip or cheek. Canker sores have a red border and a white or yellow center. They may be painful and can make it hard to talk and eat. You may have one or more than one canker sore at a time. Unlike cold sores, you cannot spread canker sores to other people. See an ...

  5. Mouth Breathing and Malocclusion - Topic Overview

    A partially blocked airway is often the cause of mouth breathing,usually due to allergies or enlarged adenoids or tonsils. A doctor should evaluate any of these conditions. Frequent mouth breathing can cause dry,red,swollen gums. This can be especially noticeable around erupting baby and permanent teeth. In children younger than 8,about half do some breathing through their mouths,...

  6. Tooth Decay - Topic Overview

    Is this topic for you?This topic provides information on tooth decay and cavities. If you are looking for information on: Gum disease, see the topic Gum Disease. Toothaches, see the topic Toothache and Gum Problems. Dental checkups and how to care for your teeth, see the topic Basic Dental Care. What is tooth decay?Tooth decay is damage that occurs when germs (bacteria) in your mouth make acids that eat away at a tooth. It can lead to a hole in the tooth, called a cavity. If not treated, tooth decay can cause pain, infection, and tooth loss. A tooth has three layers. The hard outer layer is called enamel. The middle layer is called dentin. The center of the tooth is called the pulp. It contains nerves and blood vessels. The more layers that are affected by decay, the worse the damage. What causes tooth decay?Bacteria and food can cause tooth decay. A clear, sticky substance called plaque is always forming on your teeth and gums. Plaque contains bacteria that feed on the sugars in

  7. Strep Throat - Prevention

    To avoid getting strep throat, it is a good idea to avoid contact with anyone who has a strep infection. Wash your hands often when you are around people with colds or viral or bacterial illnesses. Do not share toothbrushes or eating and drinking utensils

  8. Types of Malocclusion - Topic Overview

    The term "malocclusion" (poor bite) refers to a number of possible conditions. The most common are: Upper protrusion. In an upper protrusion,the upper front teeth are pushed outward (buck teeth). A small lower jaw may be the cause. Pacifier use or thumb-sucking can also create this condition by pushing the teeth outward,sometimes causing the roof of the mouth to change shape (upper palate). ...

  9. Antibiotics for an Abscessed Tooth

    Drug details for Antibiotics for an abscessed tooth.

  10. Strep Throat - Medications

    Antibiotics are the treatment of choice for a confirmed strep throat infection. Antibiotics will reduce the time you are contagious. You are usually not contagious 24 to 48 hours after starting antibiotics. Antibiotic treatment for strep throat can also h

Displaying 121 - 130 of 335 Articles << Prev Page 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Next >>

How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

Get the latest Oral Health newsletter delivered to your inbox!


or
Answer:
Never
(0)
Good
(1-3)
Better
(4-6)
Best
(7)

You are currently

Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

Start Over

Step:  of 

Today on WebMD

close up of woman sticking out tongue
Sores, discoloration, bumps and more.
toothbrushes
10 secrets to a brighter smile.
 
Veneer smile
Before and after.
Woman checking her bite in mirror
Why dental care is important.
 

Woman dissatisfied with granola bar
Slideshow
woman with jaw pain
Quiz
 
eroded front teeth
Slideshow
brushing teeth
Video
 

Variety shades of tea
Slideshow
mouth and dental instruments
Article
 
Closeup of a happy young guy brushing his teeth
Tool
womans smile
Video