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Oral Care

Medical Reference Related to Oral Health

  1. Dental Care: 3 Years to 6 Years - Topic Overview

    All of a child's 20 primary (baby) teeth usually break through the gums (erupt) between the ages of 6 months and 3 years. Then the permanent teeth begin to emerge, usually starting at about age 6. Your child probably had his or her first trip to the dentist between 6 and 12 months of age, and now you probably have regular appointments set up. If for some reason your child has not yet seen a dentist, make an appointment for an exam.Your 3- to 6-year-old child will be busily developing language skills and exploring the ever-widening world. Hard as it is to get a preschooler to sit still, this is the age during which you can teach good dental health habits.Your child can learn how to brush his or her own teeth at about 3 years of age and should be brushing his or her own teeth, morning and night, by age 4. You should still supervise and check for proper cleaning.Give your child a small, soft toothbrush, and apply fluoridated toothpaste in an amount about the size of a small green pea.

  2. Basic Dental Care - When To Call a Doctor

    Make an appointment with your dentist:For regular cleanings and exams. Most dentists recommend a visit every 6 months, but people who are at low risk for dental problems may need only yearly exams. If your gums bleed when you press on them or bleed often when you brush your teeth.If your teeth are loose or moving apart, or if there are changes in the way your teeth fit together.If your gums are ..

  3. Basic Dental Care - Health Tools

    Health tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health.Actionsets are designed to help people take an active role in managing a health condition. Effective tooth brushing and flossing ...

  4. Basic Dental Care - Routine Checkups

    See your dentist once or twice a year. Your dentist will examine your teeth and gums for signs of tooth decay, gum disease, and other health problems. Your dental hygienist will begin to clean your teeth by scraping hard mineral buildup (tartar) off of your teeth with a small metal tool. Then the hygienist will floss your teeth, use a polishing compound, and apply fluoride. Cleanings usually ...

  5. Brushing and Flossing a Child's Teeth - Topic Overview

    Start caring for your child's teeth as soon as you see the first baby (primary) tooth. Some tips on dental care for a child include:Clean your baby's first teeth with a clean piece of gauze, a terry cloth washcloth, or a soft - bristled baby toothbrush at least once a day. You may use one of the commercial "baby toothpastes" available for infants who are at least 5 months old. Clean your child's .

  6. Basic Dental Care - Overview

    Is this topic for you?This topic provides information on basic dental care. If you are looking for information on tooth decay or cavities, see the topic Tooth Decay. If you are looking for information on gum disease (periodontal disease), see the topic Gum Disease.What is basic dental care?Basic dental care involves brushing and flossing your teeth regularly, seeing your dentist and/or dental ...

  7. Basic Dental Care - Infants and Children

    A child's dental care really starts with his or her mother's healthy pregnancy, because baby teeth begin to form before birth. If you are pregnant, make sure to eat a balanced, nutritious diet and get an adequate amount of vitamins and minerals. It's important for pregnant women to have a complete dental exam and have any cavities or gum disease treated. For more information, see the topic ...

  8. Basic Dental Care - Common Concerns

    Following are some concerns that many people have about going to the dentist and dental care. What can I do about being scared?Dental anxiety is being nervous before or during a dental visit. This can make going to the dentist a difficult experience. You can take steps to limit your anxiety, such as explaining your fears to the dentist and setting up a system of hand signals.Do I need teeth ...

  9. Gum Disease - Frequently Asked Questions

    Learning about gum disease:What is gum disease?Getting treatment:Which antibiotics are used to treat gum disease?How is root planing and scaling done?How is gingivectomy done?How is a flap procedure done?How does a dentist remove a tooth?Living with gum disease:How should I care for my teeth when I have gum disease?

  10. Tooth Decay - Frequently Asked Questions

    Learning about tooth decay:What is tooth decay?Being diagnosed:How are dental X-rays done?Getting treatment:How is a filling done?How is a root canal done?How is a crown done?What are dental implants?How does a dentist remove a tooth?What if I'm scared to go to the dentist?

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How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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