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Oral Care

Medical Reference Related to Oral Health

  1. Temporomandibular Disorders: Medical History and Physical Exam - Topic Overview

    If a temporomandibular (TM) disorder is suspected,your dentist or primary care doctor will ask you to describe: Your jaw pain,including how long you have had it,whether you wake up with sore,stiff jaw muscles,and where you feel pain. Any recent change in the way your teeth fit together. Daily habits that may promote jaw pain-for example,whether your pain gets worse when you clench your ...

  2. Temporomandibular Disorders: Having Good Body Mechanics - Topic Overview

    Changing body mechanics can help you prevent or treat a temporomandibular (TM) disorder. Maintain good posture. Slumping your shoulders or assuming positions in which your upper body is thrust forward (many people do this to relieve back pain) disturbs the natural alignment between your facial bones and muscles. Don't sleep on the painful side of your face. Avoid sleeping on your stomach. ...

  3. Temporomandibular Disorders: Biofeedback - Topic Overview

    You can use biofeedback to help reduce temporomandibular (TM) disorder -related muscle tension. Biofeedback uses equipment that monitors muscle tension or skin temperature. Electrodes,which detect electrical current produced by muscle contraction,are placed on jaw muscles. If you clench your teeth or have poor posture,the biofeedback machine produces a signal,such as an upward-pointing ...

  4. Children and Orthodontics

    WebMD describes common types of orthodontics for children, including braces headgear, and retainers.

  5. Is Your Sore Throat a Cold, Strep Throat, or Tonsillitis?

    Got a sore throat? WebMD tells you how to tell if it’s a cold, strep throat, or tonsillitis.

  6. Diabetes & Oral Health: How to Protect Your Teeth

    Having diabetes can increase your risk of oral health problems, such as gum disease. And gum disease can interfere with blood sugar control. Learn how to protect your teeth.

  7. Tips to Keep Your Teeth Stain-Free

    Foods and drinks that can stain your teeth, and how to minimize stains.

  8. How Stress Affects Your Oral Health

    Stress can put you at risk for canker sores, gum disease, teeth grinding, and more. See how to prevent these oral health problems.

  9. 8 Ways to Protect Your Child's Oral Health

    Learn this 8-step plan for protecting your young child's teeth -- and instilling good dental habits in your older ones.

  10. Basic Dental Care - Routine Checkups

    See your dentist once or twice a year. Your dentist will examine your teeth and gums for signs of tooth decay, gum disease, and other health problems. Your dental hygienist will begin to clean your teeth by scraping hard mineral buildup (tartar) off of your teeth with a small metal tool. Then the hygienist will floss your teeth, use a polishing compound, and apply fluoride. Cleanings usually ...

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How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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Answer:
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Good
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Better
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Best
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Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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