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    Transcendental Meditation Can Help Ward Off Stroke

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    WebMD Health News

    March 2, 2000 (Los Angeles) -- Transcendental meditation (TM), an ancient stress-management technique, may decrease blood vessel blockage and help people avoid a heart attack or stroke. A study published in the March issue of the journal Stroke shows that TM decreased the thickness of blood vessel walls, a known risk factor for stroke and heart disease.

    "We were expecting to see some effect, but we were surprised to see such a large effect," author Amparo Castillo-Richmond, MD, tells WebMD. Castillo-Richmond is an assistant professor at the College of Maharishi Vedic Medicine in Fairfield, Iowa.

    The investigators studied 60 black men and women with high blood pressure. Each participant was randomly assigned either to a transcendental meditation group or to a health education program on improving risk factors for heart disease, such as lowering cholesterol through diet. The TM group meditated for 20 minutes twice a day, while the health education group spent a similar amount of time in "home practice," consisting of the leisure activity of their choice. Both groups were led by certified instructors from the black community, and the teaching materials were targeted to black people. The participants were followed for six to nine months.

    TM caused a significant decline in the thickness of the wall of the carotid artery, which supplies blood to the brain, the authors found. The effect of this change was to widen the inside of the artery and allow it to carry more blood to the brain. In contrast, the group receiving health education continued to see a worsening in the thickness of the blood-vessel walls. The TM group also had significant changes in blood pressure, as well as heart rate. Blood pressure also decreased significantly in the health education group.

    "This is the first time we have been able to show that a mind-body technique can reverse this disease," says co-author Robert H. Schneider, MD, director of the Center for Natural Medicine and Prevention at the College of Maharishi Vedic Medicine. "It is easy to do, it feels good, [it] has major beneficial effects, and it is cost effective."

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    Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

    Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

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