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Accidental Death Rate Hits 11-Year High, Group Says

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April 25, 2000 (Washington) -- The U.S. death toll from accidents in the home and office and on the highway is at its highest level in more than a decade, and a nonprofit group called the National Safety Council has launched a campaign do something about it.

More Americans between the ages of 1 and 44 die from accidents than from any other cause, the council says. Last year, accidents killed 95,500 Americans -- the highest accidental death toll since 1988 -- and seriously injured another 20 million.

"This level of unintentional injury and death is a shame, in the purest sense of the word," Jerry Scanlan, the council's president and chief executive officer, said at a news conference here Tuesday announcing its Safety Agenda for the Nation.

The Safety Agenda calls for "common-sense solutions and actions," combining education and research and leading to voluntary changes -- or, where necessary, new laws. The council is proposing a number of partnerships to set injury and death reduction goals. The American Medical Association and the American Hospital Association have already pledged their support, Scanlan says.

Among the council's other findings:

  • Deaths from unintentional injuries in the home have risen 9% since 1988, to 30,000 last year.
  • Highway fatalities dropped a percentage point, but still totaled 40,800 last year.
  • A total of 50,000 people are expected to die from fall-related injuries by 2008.
  • Fourteen people die every day in job-related accidents.

Workplace-related injuries cost the economy $127 billion dollars a year, the National Safety Council says, and it hopes to work with the Occupational Health and Safety Administration and other agencies to reduce on-the-job hazards.

"No one should be asked [to take] -- and no one should tolerate -- a potentially disabling or life-threatening risk in the name of cost-cutting," Scanlan says.

To reduce the toll from falls, the National Safety Council is working with the American Association of Retired Persons to raise awareness of the problem. It's estimated that more that 24% of all people who suffer a hip fracture will die within a year of the fall.

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Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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