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Premature Babies' Teeth Aren't Necessarily Problem Teeth

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Sept. 22, 2000 -- When Sara DeSanto's water broke at 36 weeks, her first question was why her labor began early. But the Minneapolis attorney's thoughts quickly turned to concern for her five-and-a-half pound daughter, Natalie, whose sudden birth meant she was now considered a premature baby.

"Of course, I worried about all sorts of horrible things ... did she get proper nutrition? Did she have a lack of oxygen? Then, when she was born, I was thinking, is everything properly developed?" says DeSanto.

As it turns out, her physicians have assured her that Natalie is the picture of good health, eating well and gaining weight. And now researchers reporting in the September issue of the Archives of Disease in Childhood have found that, chances are, her teeth -- both baby and permanent -- will most likely mature normally, despite her early birth.

The last trimester of pregnancy is an especially important period for the development of a child's teeth and bones, F. Sessions Cole, MD, professor of pediatrics and director of the Newborn Medicine Division at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, tells WebMD.

"In order to make teeth, and sustain teeth, you need calcium. In the last one-third of the pregnancy, the fetus gets two-thirds of the calcium he or she needs. That observation has created concern that babies born prematurely would be deprived ... and they may be deficient in calcium," which would weaken the bones and teeth, explains Cole, who was not involved in the study.

Researchers from Finland compared tooth development in 30 infants born prematurely with 60 infants born full term. They found no difference in how quickly baby -- or primary -- teeth came in among premature children compared to those who were born full term. There also was no significant difference in permanent teeth among the two groups of children, who were studied from birth, until they were preteens.

Although their main focus was teeth, the researchers also calculated the bone density of the groups of children and found no difference between the two. None of the children in the study had any major medical problems.

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Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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