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What Teeth May Come.


WebMD Health News

Reviewed by Dr. Aman Shah

Nov. 1, 2000 -- Your teeth are the hardest part of your body, but they aren't indestructible -- just ask some of the rough and tumble sports heroes whose choppers didn't withstand the last fist, elbow, or hockey puck that found its way to their mouths.

Dentists have long repaired teeth by mending them with silver, gold, or ceramics, or by making dentures. But now researchers believe that they may have begun to unravel the genetic factors responsible for tooth formation. This may allow them to grow new teeth for you using your own cells.

"We've cultivated mice teeth in a laboratory dish," says Mary MacDougall, PhD, associate dean of the University of Texas Health Science Center Dental School in San Antonio. She tells WebMD that the cells that make teeth usually die after your teeth formed, but the scientists have found a way to regenerate them.

"We've dissected out human cells that make enamel and dentin," MacDougall says. She explains that by adding a "cancer" gene, they have been able to make these cells grow and divide indefinitely instead of dying out.

This means constant division in a petri dish of cells that make enamel, the white outer tooth layer, and dentin, a hard, mineral layer under it. MacDougall's team and its collaborators at the University of Missouri at Kansas City are using this technique to make natural enamel and dentin.

"We're looking at this as a replacement for amalgam [silver used for filling cavities]," MacDougall tells WebMD. This natural, biological material would afford better bonding and better matching than current artificial fillings.

MacDougall's successful investigation thus far into gene regulation of tooth formation in mice led to a recent $4.6 million National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research grant. The scientists believe the funding will allow them to expand their research so that in about 20 years, they will be able to regenerate your own teeth in your mouth.

This would mean much to the aging American population.

"Tooth loss is a big problem because people are living longer," says Ali Bolouri, DDS, a professor of restorative sciences at Baylor College of Dentistry in Dallas. But he tells WebMD that age is not the only factor in losing your choppers. Loss of calcium in the body, smoking, diet, and dental hygiene also play roles.

Bolouri says researchers already are regenerating bone to which teeth are anchored. Bone deterioration, or severe periodontal disease, is a problem for replacing teeth because the bone won't hold dentures or implants.

Because of this, MacDougall says there is a new incentive to learn more about tooth regeneration.

"We are now looking at making human teeth in a laboratory dish that could be used instead of implants on titanium posts," she says. "They would look better, wear better, and last longer then current implants."

How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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