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Look, Ma, No Teeth

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Aug. 6, 2001 -- Whether falling flat on their face when first learning to walk or flying over a bicycle's handlebars during their preteen years, kids have a way of ensuring their parents will end up putting money where their mouth is -- or more accurately, where their teeth used to be.

By the age of 16, one-quarter of all children have had some type of dental trauma, says Martin Davis, DDS, associate dean of student affairs and the chair of pediatric dentistry at Columbia University School of Dental and Oral Surgery in New York City and president of the American Society of Dentists for Children.

Among children aged 1 to 3, such injuries often occur when the child is learning how to crawl, walk, and run, he tells WebMD. Among school-age children, most injuries are sports related -- from bike riding to organized sports such as Little League.

But tooth-proofing homes and wearing mouthguards during play can save kids lots of pain and parents lots of anxiety, Davis said at the recent annual meeting of the Academy of General Dentistry.

To tooth-proof the home, Davis says, "Put away furniture with sharp corners and edges. And if you are going to let your child use a walker, make sure that sturdy gates are fastened at the top of stairs."

Tooth CPR? You bet, Davis says.

If an accident should happen -- and they do even in the most protected environments -- and a permanent tooth is knocked out, the first thing to do is put it back in the socket and hold it in place with a tissue or handkerchief as you go to the dentist, he says.

"Or transport it in milk, which has the same concentration as blood, is cold and readily available, and slows down the cells from dying," he says.

Mouthguards should be required in many more recreational and competitive sports than they currently are, he says.

"The only sports that mouthguards are really required in are football and boxing," he says. "These guards don't just protect teeth -- they absorb shock in the chin and protect the brain. Certainly athletes should wear them when playing Little League baseball and high school basketball."

How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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