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    More Chinese-Made Toothpaste Recalled

    Gilchrest & Soames Recalls Toothpaste Supplied to Hotels Worldwide Because of Toxic Chemical DEG
    By
    WebMD Health News
    Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

    Aug. 13, 2007 -- Gilchrest & Soames, a hotel toiletry supplier, today issued a worldwide recall of its complimentary toothpaste, which may contain the toxic chemical diethylene glycol (DEG).

    The Indianapolis-based company is recalling its Gilchrest & Soames 0.65-ounce/18-milliliter tubes of toothpaste, which were made in China.

    The voluntary recall comes after independent lab tests detected DEG in some samples of the toothpaste.

    DEG (diethylene glycol) is a poisonous chemical used in antifreeze and as a solvent. Gilchrest & Soames and the FDA aren't aware of any illnesses or deaths linked to DEG poisoning from toothpaste.

    Gilchrest & Soames states that it believes that the glycerin product used in its toothpaste formulation contained DEG.

    But "DEG is not in our toothpaste formulation, and DEG should never have been used in the manufacture of our toothpaste," declares Gilchrest & Soames.

    Gilchrest & Soames Toothpaste Recall

    Gilchrest & Soames supplied the toothpaste to certain hotels in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Bermuda, Barbados, Dominican Republic, Turks and Caicos Islands, U.K., Ireland, Spain, Belgium, France, Italy, Germany, Switzerland, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

    The company is asking the hotels it supplies to destroy the recalled toothpaste. Hotel guests who received Gilchrest & Soames toothpaste at a hotel should throw the toothpaste out immediately, putting it in a sealed trash container so that children or pets don't get into it.

    On June 1, the FDA warned of DEG in certain toothpastes made in China.

    When Gilchrest & Soames heard that news, the company contacted its two Chinese toothpaste suppliers and began independent lab tests in Hong Kong and the U.S.

    The fifth round of those lab tests "showed the presence of DEG in some samples at levels exceeding FDA guidelines from one of our two suppliers," Gilchrest & Soames President Kathie De Voe says in a company news release.

    For more information on the Gilchrest & Soames toothpaste recall, call Gilchrest & Soames at (866) 587-6542.

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    Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

    Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

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    American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

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