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    FDA Panel Urges Thorough Review of Mercury-Based Fillings

    Experts, Public Question 2009 Ruling That Mercury in Dental Amalgams Is Safe
    By
    WebMD Health News
    Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

    Dec. 15, 2010 -- An advisory panel today recommended that the FDA examine all relevant evidence in reviewing its 2009 ruling that mercury-containing fillings known as dental amalgams are safe.

    The agency needs to look at “not just certain studies but all scientifically sound studies,” said panel member Judith Zelikoff, PhD, of the Institute of Environmental Medicine in Tuxedo, N.Y.

    At issue over the two-day meeting, which concluded today, were questions raised about how the agency reached its decision in July of last year. In four petitions, members of consumer and dental groups criticized the FDA’s decision-making progress, arguing that the agency had used flawed and insufficient data to draw conclusions about safety.

    The panel, which generally held that amalgams are safe for most people, did agree that there is not enough data to rule out the possibility that a small but significant number of people might be at risk from exposure to mercury in the fillings.

    Existing studies “provide compelling evidence that there is no effect level for the general population,” said panelist Susan Griffin, PhD, of the EPA, “but there does appear to be a very sensitive subpopulation.”

    Several such people testified during the open hearing portion of today’s meeting.

    “I was a dental assistant for 24 years, now I get $700 a month in disability payments,” said Karen Burns, who told the panel that exposure to mercury in the workplace had led to crippling, career-ending symptoms. Her story was echoed by several other public speakers who also told the panel that they or family members had suffered from mercury poisoning.

    High levels of exposure to mercury can cause brain and kidney damage. Memory and hearing loss are symptoms associated with mercury poisoning, as are tremors, irritability, mood swings, insomnia, and headaches.

    “My brain started vibrating inside my skull as if it were trying to get out,” Marie Flowers told the panel of her experiences after amalgams were implanted in her mouth. Flowers spoke on behalf of Dental Amalgam Mercury Solutions, a group formed to educate the public on what it considers the risks of mercury-based fillings.

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    Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

    Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

    SOURCES:

    American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

    This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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