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Millions in U.S. Lack Access to Dentists

Study Shows Geography, Economics, and Shortage of Dentists Limit Dental Care

Boosting Access to Dental Care continued...

The committee called on federal officials to fund state-based "demonstration projects" aimed at providing dental care to adult Medicaid recipients.

In addition, the committee recommended increasing Medicaid and CHIP reimbursements and simplifying administrative practices.

"A growing number of dental professionals will not take people on these programs because reimbursements are just too low," Rivara says.

The committee called on state officials to update their dental practice regulations with the goal of doing away with restrictions that limit access to dental services.

One example cited by Gehshan involved the application of fluoride sealants that help prevent cavities.

She says 22 states still require a dentist to examine a child before a dental hygienist is allowed to apply a sealant.

New Ways to Deliver Dental Care

Gehshan says innovative ways of delivering dental services will be needed to address the shortage of dentists.

The report called for more research into new approaches to care, including the use of mobile dental vans staffed by dental hygienists or practitioners who have several years of dental training but are not dentists.

Known as dental therapists, these practitioners are the oral health equivalent of nurse practitioners.

Only two states -- Alaska and Minnesota -- license dental therapists, but at least 50 other countries allow them to practice, Gehshan says.

The American Dental Association (ADA) has come out strongly against allowing non-dentists to perform surgery.

In a statement, ADA President Raymond F. Gist, DDS, praises the IOM report for highlighting the dental care access issue.

Gist notes that the ADA continues to support exploring new ways to expand access to dental care, but he adds, "We must, however, restate our opposition to allowing so-called 'midlevel providers' to diagnose disease or perform such surgical, irreversible procedures as extractions. Everyone deserves a dentist."

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How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

Number of Days Per Week I Floss

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or
Answer:
Never
(0)
Good
(1-3)
Better
(4-6)
Best
(7)

You are currently

Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

SOURCES:

American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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