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Too Many Antibiotics Prescribed for Sore Throats?

Most ills are caused by viruses, end on their own, researchers report

WebMD News from HealthDay

German study of TMJ patients didn't pin down how

By Steven Reinberg

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Despite efforts to curb the unnecessary use of antibiotics, many doctors still prescribe them for illnesses that don't respond to the medications, Harvard researchers report.

Antibiotics only work against bacterial infections, and yet they are prescribed at a rate of 60 percent for sore throats and 73 percent for bronchitis, conditions that are typically caused by viruses, the scientists said.

"For sore throat, antibiotics should be prescribed about 10 percent of the time," said study author Dr. Jeffrey Linder, a researcher in the division of general medicine and primary care at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

Although the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention encourages the proper use of antibiotics, their use for sore throats has only dropped from about 70 percent of doctor visits in 1990 to 60 percent of visits now, he said.

"The story for bronchitis is even more bleak," Linder said. "The antibiotic prescribing rate was 73 percent and the right prescribing rate for bronchitis, according to guidelines, is zero," he said. "That hasn't changed at all over the last 30 years."

Linder thinks these rates remain high because, on the one hand, patients demand antibiotics from their doctors and, on the other hand, doctors don't want to miss a more serious condition such as pneumonia or strep throat.

"There's plenty of blame to go around," he said. "It's a lot easier to write a prescription than to have a five-minute conversation about why antibiotics aren't necessary.

"We need to have more faith in our bodies to get better from what are self-limiting conditions," he added. "The vast majority of sore throats, and virtually all of bronchitis [cases], get better on its own."

The report on sore throats was published online Oct. 3 in JAMA Internal Medicine, and the results of the bronchitis study are scheduled for presentation Thursday at ID Week 2013 in San Francisco.

Research presented at medical meetings is typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Dr. Marc Siegel, an associate professor of medicine at the NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City, said, "This isn't new -- we are not listening."

"This leads to more antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and when we do that we don't have the antibiotics when we need them because the body has developed resistance," he said.

Siegel said the true cost of antibiotic overuse is not in the cost of the pills themselves, but rather in the consequences of treating diseases caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) and Clostridium difficile.

"This is going to be an enormous financial burden on the health care system," he said.

Linder is more concerned with the potential harmful side effects of antibiotics when they are used for conditions they can't treat.

How Do I Measure Up? Get the Facts Fast!

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Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

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American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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