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Connection Between Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate - Topic Overview

Cleft lip and cleft palate are both birth defects of the mouth. The combination of cleft lip and cleft palate is one of the most common birth defects. Although research continues on specific causes of cleft lip and cleft palate, they may result from sporadic or inherited genetic mutations or from certain maternal environmental exposures (for example, from smoking) during pregnancy.

Both of these birth defects form early in fetal development and can occur independently of each other (isolated) or in combination.

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Cleft lip is one or more splits (clefts) in the upper lip. Cleft lip can range from a small indentation in the lip to a split in the lip that may extend up into one or both nostrils. Cleft lip develops in about the sixth to eighth week of gestation, when structures in the upper jaw do not fuse properly and the upper lip does not completely merge. Sometimes the nasal cavity, palate, and upper teeth are also affected.

Cleft palate is an opening in the roof of the mouth that develops when the bones and tissues do not completely join during fetal growth, sometime between the seventh and twelfth weeks of gestation. The severity and type of cleft palate vary according to where the cleft occurs on the palate and whether all the layers of the palate are affected. A mild form of cleft palate may not be visible because tissue covers the cleft. A complete cleft palate involves all layers of tissue of the soft palate, extends to and includes the hard palate, and may continue to the lip and nose. Sometimes problems linked with cleft palate also include deformities of the nasal cavities and/or the partition separating them (septum).

Cleft lip, whether isolated or occurring with cleft palate, is more common in males; isolated cleft palate occurs more often in females. Cleft palate—with or without cleft lip—is sometimes linked with other health conditions, such as fetal alcohol syndrome or chromosomal syndromes like trisomy 13 and 18.

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http:// cancer .gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: October 16, 2013
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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    Only 18.5% of Americans never floss. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Floss removes food trapped between the teeth and removes the film of bacteria that forms there before it turns to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Try flossing just one tooth to get started.

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily. You are missing out on a simple way to make a big difference in the health of your mouth. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for 3 more days!

    You are one of 31% of Americans who don't floss daily, but you're well on your way to making a positive impact on your teeth and gums. Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Aim for all 7 days!

    Only 50.5% of Americans floss daily, and good for you that you are one of them! Regardless of how well you brush, plaque still forms between your teeth and along your gums. Toothbrush bristles alone cannot clean effectively between these tight spaces. Flossing removes up to 80% of the film that hardens to plaque, which can cause inflamed gums (gingivitis), cavities, and tooth loss. Congratulations on your good oral health habit!

    SOURCES:

    American Dental Association, Healthy People 2010

    This tool is intended only for adults 18 and older.

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