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Osteoarthritis Health Center

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Using MRI to Diagnose Arthritis

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In diagnosing arthritis, an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan can be helpful. An MRI scan is a test that produces very clear pictures of the human body without the use of X-rays. MRI uses a large magnet, radio waves, and a computer to produce these images.

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Why Should I Get an MRI for Arthritis?

  • To detect arthritis. MRI can be helpful in evaluating joint damage, particularly damage to the spine, knee, or shoulder.
  • To track the progress of disease. In repeat scans, MRI can determine how fast the arthritis is progressing.

Is the MRI Exam Safe?

Yes. The MRI exam poses no risk to the average person if appropriate safety guidelines are followed. People who have had heart surgery and people with the following medical devices can be safely examined with MRI:

  • Surgical clips or sutures
  • Artificial joints
  • Staples
  • Cardiac valve replacements (except the Starr-Edwards metallic ball/cage)
  • Disconnected medication pumps
  • Vena cava filters
  • Brain shunt tubes for hydrocephalus

Some conditions may make an MRI exam inadvisable. Tell your doctor if you have any of the following conditions:

How Long Does the MRI Exam Take?

Allow two hours for your MRI exam. In most cases, the procedure takes 40 to 80 minutes and produces multiple images.

What Happens Before the MRI Exam?

Personal items such as your watch, wallet (including any credit cards with magnetic strips that can be erased by the magnet), and jewelry should be left at home if possible or removed prior to the MRI scan. Secured lockers are available to store personal possessions.

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