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Osteoarthritis Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Osteoarthritis

  1. Osteoarthritis - Cause

    Osteoarthritis results from chemical changes in the cartilage that cause it to break down faster than it can be produced. In most cases, experts don't know the cause of this cartilage breakdown.

  2. Osteoarthritis - What Happens

    Osteoarthritis is a slow, progressive disease. Cartilage gradually breaks down until the bones, which were once separated by cartilage, begin to rub against each other.

  3. Osteoarthritis - Medications

    Medicine can often help you to relieve the symptoms of osteoarthritis and allow you to continue daily activities. However, pain relief medication does not cure arthritis or decrease the rate of cartilage breakdown and should be used in conjunction with ho

  4. Osteoarthritis - Topic Overview

    What is osteoarthritis?Healthy joints help your body move, bend, and twist. Knees glide up and down stairs without creaking or crunching. Hips move you along on a walk without a complaint. But when osteoarthritis affects your joints, such simple, everyday movements can hurt. Taking the stairs can be painful. Walking a few steps, opening a door, and even combing your hair can be hard. ...

  5. Osteoarthritis - What Increases Your Risk

    Learn the factors that seem to increase the risk of developing osteoarthritis.

  6. Osteoarthritis - Home Treatment

    Learn steps to help relieve the pain caused by osteoarthritis and improve your joint function.

  7. Your Guide to Joint Replacement for Osteoarthritis

    WebMD answers your questions about joint replacement surgery.

  8. Arthritis Pain Relief: Risks and Benefits

    Learn more from WebMD about the various medications, supplements, and alternative treatments available to relieve pain caused by osteoarthritis.

  9. Risser Sign in Scoliosis - Topic Overview

    The Risser sign helps measures the risk that a curve in the spine (scoliosis) will get worse, or progress. It measures how much mature bone has developed (ossification) in the upper rim of the pelvis (iliac crest). Values range from 0 (least ossification and greatest risk of progression) to 5 (complete ossification and least risk of progression). This is determined by an X-ray.

  10. Scoliosis Surgery: Posterior Approach - Topic Overview

    The posterior approach for scoliosis surgery is done from the back of the body. It involves making a long, straight incision into the back and moving aside the back muscles to reveal the spine.Rods, wires, hooks, or screws are attached to the spine in various ways. The spine is repositioned and held in place with these mechanisms while the new bone surface fuses. Bone grafts, often taken from the person's pelvic bone or ribs, are put in place to help the spinal bones fuse together in a permanent position over time.

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