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Osteoarthritis Health Center

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Capsaicin for Osteoarthritis - Topic Overview

Capsaicin (Zostrix), available without a prescription, is a pain reliever that comes in a cream that you apply directly to your skin (topical analgesic). It has been found to relieve joint pain from osteoarthritis in some people when rubbed into the skin over affected joints.1 To be beneficial, the cream must be applied 3 or 4 times a day. And the effects may not be seen for several weeks.

The main ingredient in capsaicin is an extract from hot peppers. It appears to have no serious side effects. But some people may be allergic to capsaicin. The first time you use this topical cream, apply it to just a small area of skin to make sure there is no allergic reaction. Even people who are not allergic may notice a burning sensation. Some people may not be able to tolerate the discomfort associated with using capsaicin.

Recommended Related to Osteoarthritis

11 Knee Pain Dos and Don’ts

There are many things you can do to help knee pain, whether it's due to a recent injury or arthritis you've had for years.  Follow these 11 dos and don’ts to help your knees feel their best. Don’t rest too much. Too much rest can weaken your muscles, which can worsen joint pain. Find an exercise program that is safe for your knees and stick with it. If you're not sure which motions are safe or how much you can do, talk with your doctor or a physical therapist.  Do exercise. Cardio exercises...

Read the 11 Knee Pain Dos and Don’ts article > >

WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Last Updated: September 09, 2014
This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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