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Osteoarthritis Health Center

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Coping With Osteoarthritis - Topic Overview

When you find out that you have osteoarthritis, you may be scared and worried about how it may change your life, work, and relationships.

It's hard to know how fast your arthritis may progress. Your symptoms may come and go, stay the same, or get worse over time. Some days you may feel fine and be able to do the things you need-and want-to do with little pain. Other days the pain may be too much for you to do simple tasks like getting dressed or brushing your teeth.

At times you may feel overwhelmed, tired, and angry. You may be afraid that you might become disabled and not be able to care for yourself. You may even wonder if you'll be able to continue to work. These feelings are normal. Most people who have arthritis feel this way at one time or another.

Some people with arthritis also feel down or depressed. They may describe this as feeling "depressed," "unhappy," "short-tempered," "blue," or "down in the dumps." If you feel like this most of the time, tell your doctor. Treating these symptoms may help you feel better and make it easier for you to do your daily tasks.

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