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Osteoarthritis Health Center

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Scoliosis Screening - Topic Overview

A doctor may test a young person for scoliosis during a routine physical exam. In schools, screening may be provided annually for students between the ages of 10 and 14 (grades 5 through 9). The exam takes about 30 seconds and may be done by a school nurse or physical education teacher.

  • The examiner first views the child from behind, looking for uneven shoulders, hips, or waistline or for shoulder blades that stick out or are uneven.
  • The child then bends forward from the waist, with the arms hanging down loosely and the palms touching (forward-bending test). The examiner looks for any unevenness, such as one side of the rib cage that is higher than the other. The examiner may also view the child from the side to detect a hump on the upper back (kyphosis).
  • Also, the examiner may measure the angle of trunk rotation (ATR) with a device called a scoliometer.

Some states require screening for scoliosis by law. But health experts don't agree with whether or not to screen for scoliosis.1, 2 Screening can lead to early treatment and may prevent curves from getting worse, but screening can also lead to more testing or treatment for children who would not have needed it. Some experts believe that children (especially daughters) of women who have scoliosis should be screened for scoliosis regularly throughout their late childhood and teen years.3 If you are concerned about screening for scoliosis, talk to your child's doctor.

Recommended Related to Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis: 10 Tips for Self-Care at Home

Here are simple ways you can ease osteoarthritis symptoms on your own, at home. 1. Stay active. Exercise may be the last thing you want to do when your arthritis hurts. But many studies show that physical activity is one of the best ways to improve your quality of life. Exercise boosts your energy. It can also strengthen your muscles and bones, and help keep your joints flexible. Try resistance training to build stronger muscles. Your muscles protect and support joints affected by arthritis...

Read the Osteoarthritis: 10 Tips for Self-Care at Home article > >

For more information, see the topic Scoliosis.

    WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

    Last Updated: November 14, 2014
    This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.
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