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When most of us think of the " brittle bone disease" known as osteoporosis, we picture a frail older woman with a broken hip or stooped shoulders. But you can't tell if someone has osteoporosis just by looking at them. Doctors need to review your personal and family history, your habits, as well as a bone density test to find your personal risk.

"It could be an elderly lady, a man, or a younger woman who is fine, but is 5 feet tall and weighs 93 pounds," says Ethel S. Siris, MD, of Columbia University Medical Center in New York.

Osteoporosis develops when our bodies don't build new bone as quickly as they remove old bone. Bones become weak and brittle and are more likely to fracture or break.

Some fractures happen when you take a big fall, while others can follow something as harmless as a hug or just bending over. Fractures due to osteoporosis are most common in the spine and hip.

What Raises Your Risk for Osteoporosis?

"When an older woman or man has a fracture, we must see if they have low bone mass or osteoporosis," says Siris. This is the biggest red-flag warning that more fractures can follow.

When Do You Need a Bone Density Test?

A bone density test can diagnose osteoporosis before a broken bone occurs. The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends this X-ray for:

  • All women 65 and older
  • Younger women who have risk factors for osteoporosis
  • Men 70 and older
  • Men 50-69 with risk factors for osteoporosis

Some doctors use the FRAX formula (Fracture Risk Assessment Tool) to estimate your chance of breaking a bone within the next 10 years. It adds up past fractures, gender, smoking, alcohol use, and sometimes bone density test results in the hip, as well as other factors.