Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up

Osteoporosis Health Center

Select An Article
Font Size

Osteoporosis Risk Factors: Fact vs. Fiction

Think you know all about osteoporosis? Chances are, some of the things you think you know about osteoporosis risk factors may be wrong. Osteoporosis is a complicated disease, one that we are still learning about. With all the changing information out there, it's easy to get confused.

Here are a few common myths about osteoporosis risk factors.

Recommended Related to Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis Medications: How They Work

Think your bones stopped growing by the time you finished high school? Think again. Bones constantly remodel themselves throughout life, growing here, thinning there. In osteoporosis, though, normal bone remodeling goes awry. Bone loss exceeds bone growth, and bones become thin and weak. Osteoporosis affects 10 million Americans, leading to 1.5 million fractures every year. Osteoporosis medications and physical activity can tip the balance of bone remodeling, preserving bone strength. How...

Read the Osteoporosis Medications: How They Work article > >

Fiction: Only women need to worry about osteoporosis.

It's true osteoporosis affects women far more than it does men. About 80% of all osteoporosis patients are women. But that means that men account for 20% of cases -- and since the disease affects 10 million people (and growing), that means 2 million men in the U.S. have osteoporosis right now. Another 3 million have osteopenia, the decline in bone mass that can progress to osteoporosis if not properly treated. Men actually have a greater risk of developing a fracture related to osteoporosis than prostate cancer, and they're nearly twice as likely as women to die in the year following a fracture.

"In older men and women of the same age, women have about 90% of the spine fractures. But men have about one-third of the hip fractures, and that's an awful lot," says Robert Heaney, MD, FACP, a professor of medicine at Creighton University, in Omaha, Neb., and a nationally recognized expert on osteoporosis. He is also an advisory panel member for the National Dairy Council's 3-A-Day of Dairy program. "It's not an exclusively female disease by any means, and men need to take it seriously as well."

Fiction: If you are on an osteoporosis drug, you don't need to worry about getting enough calcium and vitamin D.

You may assume that the drug you're taking to treat your osteoporosis has calcium and vitamin D in it as well -- but that's not necessarily the case. "The drugs can help prevent bone loss, but they don't give you the raw materials -- calcium and phosphorus -- that make up bone minerals. If the body doesn't have that, the drugs can't help it." Heaney told WebMD. Be sure to eat a diet rich in calcium, even if you are taking medication, and ask your physician about osteoporosis drugs that include Vitamin D.

Fiction: It doesn't matter if you get calcium and vitamin D from your diet or from supplements.

It's true that you should get calcium and vitamin D any way you can, and if supplements are the only way you can get them, then it's better to take supplements than miss out on these essential nutrients entirely.

However, study after study has shown that people aren't very good at taking supplements regularly, says Heaney. "But eating is something you do every day, so it's easier to make a habit of dairy consumption. Whether it's milk, yogurt, or cheese doesn't really matter -- they're all good." You can also get vitamin D from the many new fortified foods, like cereals and orange juices, now available.

Second, foods give you more of the nutrients you need than supplements. There are many dietary sources, such as dairy products, that contain many nutrients necessary for bone health, Heaney says. Bone is made of protein as well as minerals, with calcium being a principal one. Many dietary sources contain protein, phosphorus, and many other nutrients necessary for total body health.

WebMD Medical Reference

Next Article:

Today on WebMD

Women working out and walking with weights
Reduce bone loss and build stronger muscles.
Chinese cabbage
Calcium-rich foods to add to your diet.
 
woman stretching
Get the facts on osteoporosis.
Porous bone
Causes, symptoms, risk factors, and treatment.
 
Lactose Intolerance
Article
Woman holding plate of brocolli
Article
 
Dairy products
Tool
Superfood for Bones
Slideshow
 
Screening Tests for Women
Slideshow
exercise endometrial cancer
Article
 
hand holding medicine
Article
Working Out With Osteoporosis
Video