Skip to content

Osteoporosis Health Center

Select An Article

Osteoporosis Bone Fractures: A Treatment Overview

Font Size

You may have done your best to prevent a broken bone caused by osteoporosis. Or maybe you didn't even know your bones were at risk. Either way, your fracture can heal, and you can work closely with your doctor to avoid it ever happening again.

Fractures of the spine, hip, or wrist are the most common types in people with osteoporosis.

Recommended Related to Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis Pain

Osteoporosis is often called the "silent disease," because most of the time, bone loss occurs without any symptoms at all. But when osteoporosis becomes severe, it can lead to fractures and a condition called kyphosis. Kyphosis is a deformity resulting from spinal compression fractures, sometimes described as the "dowager's hump." Both fractures and kyphosis can be very painful. This pain is usually more severe than the typical "aches and pains" many people feel as they get older.

Read the Osteoporosis Pain article > >

Fragility Fractures

Falls and bumps that wouldn't hurt a person with healthy bones can damage them when you have osteoporosis. Doctors call these injuries low trauma or fragility fractures. If you fall from standing height and break a bone, for example, you'll need treatment for this type of injury.

Some fractures can heal on their own, depending on which bone is broken and how severe the break.

When you need further treatment your doctor may refer you on to specialists such as:

  • An orthopedic doctor, who can help cast and repair your broken bone.
  • A physiatrist, who treats nerve, muscle, and bone problems that affect how you move.
  • A physical therapist or occupational therapist, who show you exercises and other ways to recover and resume your regular activities.

Fractures can hurt for a while, especially if you've broken a hip or a vertebra in your spine, called a compression fracture. You may need medicine for the pain. Ask your doctor to review everything you take, too, even if you didn't need a prescription for it or if it's "natural." That way you doctor can check on any possible side effects, like dizziness that could put you at risk for a fall.

Healing Your Spine

In some cases, you'll only need rest, pain medicine, exercises, and perhaps a back brace or treatment for muscle spasms while you're healing. A brace keeps your spine stable while the broken bone heals.

If your pain persists and is severe, your doctor may see if you're a candidate for:

  • Vertebroplasty. The doctor injects bone cement into the spine to keep it stable. This lessens pain, and it can also help prevent further fractures of the vertebrae and a curved spine.
  • Kyphoplasty. A doctor inserts a balloon device into the fractured vertebra. This helps restore the height and shape of the vertebra. Once removed, the device leaves a small cavity that is then filled with special bone cement.

If your doctor recommends either procedure, talk with them about the risks, benefits, and recovery time.

Next Article:

Today on WebMD

Women working out and walking with weights
Reduce bone loss and build stronger muscles.
Chinese cabbage
Calcium-rich foods to add to your diet.
woman stretching
Get the facts on osteoporosis.
Porous bone
Causes, symptoms, risk factors, and treatment.
senior woman
Woman holding plate of brocolli
wrist xray
Superfood for Bones
mature woman
sunlight in hands
man and woman in front of xray
woman with dumbbells