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Osteoporosis Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Osteoporosis

  1. Juvenile Osteoporosis

    Children and teens can get osteoporosis -- called juvenile osteoporosis - that can make their bones prone to fracture. Learn more from WebMD about its causes and treatment.

  2. Osteoporosis in Men

    Osteoporosis in men.

  3. Preventing Osteoporosis: 9 Questions and Answers

    Get answers to some of your most common questions about osteoporosis and bone health.

  4. Osteoporosis: An Overview

    Are you at risk for osteoporosis, or weakening of the bones? Learn more from WebMD about causes, symptoms, treatment, and prevention of the condition.

  5. Understanding Osteoporosis -- Symptoms

    Understand the symptoms of osteoporosis from the experts at WebMD.

  6. Understanding Osteoporosis -- Diagnosis and Treatment

    Learn the basics about osteoporosis diagnosis and treatment from the health experts at WebMD.

  7. Understanding Osteoporosis -- Prevention

    It is possible to prevent osteoporosis. Learn how with these tips from the experts at WebMD.

  8. Causes of Spinal Compression Fractures

    Spinal compression fractures -- often caused by osteoporosis -- is a bigger problem than many people realize. Learn more.

  9. Preventing Spinal Compression Fractures

    To help prevent spinal compression fractures, build stronger bones. Learn more about osteoporosis, nutrients like calcium and Vitamin D, and exercise.

  10. Vitamin D Test

    A vitamin D test measures the amount of vitamin D in the blood. Your body needs vitamin D to absorb calcium. Calcium keeps your bones and muscles healthy and strong. If your muscles don't get enough calcium, they can cramp, hurt, or feel weak. You may have long-term (chronic) muscle aches and pains. If you don't get enough vitamin D throughout life, you are more likely to have thin and brittle bones (osteoporosis) in your later years. Children who don't get enough vitamin D may not grow as much as others their age. They also have a chance of getting a rare disease called rickets. Your body uses sunshine to make its own vitamin D. Vitamin D is found in foods such as egg yolks, liver, and saltwater fish. It is added to many food products, such as milk and cereals. You can also get it as supplements, often combined with calcium. Many people can get the amount of vitamin D needed each day through food and sunlight. The vitamin D test is also called the 25-hydroxy vitamin D, or 25(OH)D,

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