Skip to content

Osteoporosis Health Center

Milk Helps Keep Men's Bones Strong

Researcher Says Few of Us Drink Enough Milk
Font Size
A
A
A
By Linda Little
WebMD Health News

Sept. 23, 2005 (Nashville, Tenn.) - Real men may not eat quiche, but they might want to drink milk.

The number of older men getting osteoporosis, making them susceptible to bone fractures, is increasing. But a large glass of fortified, low-fat milk may aid in warding off that brittle-bone disease.

"A large glass a day of fortified milk may provide a simple, inexpensive, and effective way to slow or stop the age-related bone loss in men," says Robin Daly, a research fellow in the School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences at Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia.

Less Bone Loss With Milk

Australian researchers took 167 men over the age of 50 and randomly assigned them to either drink a glass of milk fortified with 1,000 milligrams of calcium and 800 international units of vitamin D a day or continue on their usual diet.

The men's bone mineral density -- an indicator of bone strength -- was checked every six months over a two-year period.

The findings were presented at the American Society of Bone and Mineral Research meeting.

Researchers found that 88% of the men in the milk group were compliant in drinking their fortified milk. The men had no weight gain.

At the end of the study, the rate of bone loss was about 1.6% less than the comparison group. There was no difference in bone density in the spine.

The milk drinkers also had higher levels of vitamin D and lower levels of parathyroid hormone, a hormone that breaks down bone.

"The rate of bone loss was less in the milk drinkers," says Daly. "Men are living longer and more are being diagnosed with osteoporosis. Yet grown men don't usually drink a lot of milk."

Giving Milk a Punch

The milk used in the study contained much higher levels of calcium and vitamin D than milk on store shelves.

A glass of milk contains about 300 milligrams of calcium and close to 100 international units of vitamin D. Milk isn't fortified in Australia, says Daly.

Calcium helps keep bones strong. And vitamin D helps the body better use calcium.

1 | 2 | 3

Today on WebMD

Women working out and walking with weights
Reduce bone loss and build stronger muscles.
Chinese cabbage
Calcium-rich foods to add to your diet.
 
woman stretching
Get the facts on osteoporosis.
Porous bone
Causes, symptoms, risk factors, and treatment.
 
Lactose Intolerance
Article
Woman holding plate of brocolli
Article
 
Dairy products
Tool
Superfood for Bones
Slideshow
 
Screening Tests for Women
Slideshow
exercise endometrial cancer
Article
 
hand holding medicine
Article
Working Out With Osteoporosis
Video