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Osteoporosis Myth: Broken Bones From Falls Are Not Related to Osteoporosis

Reality: Fractures in individuals over the age of 50 can be the first sign of weak bones from osteoporosis or low bone mass. Each year, 1.5 million older Americans suffer a bone fracture due to osteoporosis. Half of all women over 50, and a quarter of all men, will suffer an osteoporosis-related fracture sometime in their remaining life. And the problem is increasing: the surgeon general estimates that by 2020, half of all Americans over 50 will be at risk for bone fractures from osteoporosis and low bone mass.

If you are over 50, any broken bone should be taken very seriously. You may think to yourself, "Anyone would have broken a bone after taking a fall like that," but a break after a fall in people over 50 may be a critical sign of osteoporosis. Talk with your doctor about whether you should have a bone density test to determine if your fracture could be due to osteoporosis.

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Causes of Spinal Compression Fractures

If you're nearing age 60 and have back pain, don't assume it's a normal part of getting older. You could be affected by a spinal compression fracture. Back aches and pains can be a sign that small fractures are occurring in your vertebrae - the bones that form your spine. Soft, weakened bones are at the heart of this problem. Compression fractures are often caused by bone-thinning osteoporosis, especially if you are a postmenopausal woman over age 50. When bones are brittle, everyday activities...

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There are many medications available to treat osteoporosis, and they have been shown to substantially reduce the risk of bone fractures in people with osteoporosis. If your doctor prescribes an osteoporosis medication, it's important to keep taking it even if you don't see improvements on your next bone density scan. Osteoporosis drugs can be reducing your risk of bone fracture in ways that don't show up on a bone density scan. And as always, you should continue to eat a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D.

WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by David Zelman, MD on January 14, 2015

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