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    Why Do We Have Bones?

    Why Do We Have Bones?

    The bony skeleton is a remarkable organ that serves both a structural function—providing mobility, support, and protection for the body—and a reservoir function, as the storehouse for essential minerals. It is not a static organ, but is constantly changing to better carry out its functions. The development of the bony skeleton likely began many eons ago, when animals left the calcium-rich ocean, first to live in fresh water where calcium was in short supply, and then on dry land where weight bearing put much greater stress on the skeleton. The architecture of the skeleton is remarkably adapted to provide adequate strength and mobility so that bones do not break when subjected to substantial impact, even the loads placed on bone during vigorous physical activity. The shape or structure of bone is at least as important as its mass in providing this strength.

    The skeleton is also a storehouse for two minerals, calcium and phosphorus, that are essential for the functioning of other body systems, and this storehouse must be called upon in times of need. The maintenance of a constant level of calcium in the blood as well as an adequate supply of calcium and phosphorus in cells is critical for the function of all body organs, but particularly for the nerves and muscle. Therefore, a complex system of regulatory hormones has developed that helps to maintain adequate supplies of these minerals in a variety of situations. These hormones act not only on bone but on other tissues, such as the intestine and the kidney, to regulate the supply of these elements. Thus one reason that bone health is difficult to maintain is that the skeleton is simultaneously serving two different functions that are in competition with each other. First, bone must be responsive to changes in mechanical loading or weight bearing, both of which require strong bones that have ample supplies of calcium and phosphorus. When these elements are in short supply the regulating hormones take them out of the bone to serve vital functions in other systems of the body. Thus the skeleton can be likened to a bank where we can deposit calcium or phosphorus and then withdraw them later in times of need. However, too many withdrawals weaken the bone and can lead to the most common bone disorder, fractures.

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    Easy Living Tips After a Fracture

    When you're nursing a broken bone, you may be tempted to rest safely on a sofa, day and night, until it's healed. Don't! Your recovery will go better if you follow your doctor’s orders and stay as active as possible. You may need to do things differently for a while. But the rewards for staying active are great. You'll build strength and protect your bones from weakening, says Robert Dorman, a physical therapist at Massachusetts General in Boston. Ease back into your home routine with these smart...

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