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Caring for Your Skin, Hair, and Nails During Chemotherapy

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WebMD Feature

Treating cancer with chemotherapy kills cancer cells, but unfortunately, many patients also have unwanted side effects, such as hair loss, dry skin, and brittle nails.

Watching your hair fall out can be especially distressing. “Generally, how we look is really important to most all of us. The thought of losing hair can be especially devastating to some people,” says Terri Ades, DNP, FNP-BC, AOCN, director of cancer information for the American Cancer Society.

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But cancer patients have many ways to cope with such changes from cutting their hair short to moisturizing their skin regularly.

“It is important for people to know that there are many things that they can do to prevent these side effects,” says Mario Lacouture, MD, a dermatologist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center who focuses on treating cancer therapy’s side effects to the skin, hair and nails.

 

Skin Care During Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy often causes dry, irritated skin. Rather than waiting to deal with symptoms after treatment starts, patients can take steps to minimize skin problems about one week before beginning chemo. Then, they can continue the regimen during treatment.

“There are many things that you can do to prevent that dry skin,” says Lacouture. “People tend to think of dry skin as just a cosmetic problem, but ... dry skin can get so severely dry that it becomes inflamed and more susceptible to infections.”

Lacouture’s offers these tips to prevent skin problems during chemotherapy:

  • Avoid long, hot showers or baths.
  • Use gentle, fragrance-free soaps and laundry detergent.
  • Use moisturizers, preferably creams or ointments rather than lotions because the thicker consistency is better at preventing skin dehydration. Apply the cream or ointment within 15 minutes of showering. Reapply moisturizer at night, and moisturize your hands every time after you wash them.
  • If your skin is very dry and flaky, ammonium lactate cream can increase moisture. These creams are available by prescription and over-the-counter.
  • Some chemotherapy drugs make skin more susceptible to sunburn. Use a sunscreen with at least an SPF 30, and make sure that it protects against both UVA and UVB rays. Protection against UVA requires ingredients such as zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, or avobenzone. 
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