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Ovarian Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Ovarian Cancer

  1. Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Recurrent or Persistent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    Recurrent ovarian epithelial cancer is cancer that has recurred (come back) after it has been treated. Persistent cancer is cancer that does not go away with treatment.

  2. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (03 / 07 / 2014)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Editorial changes were made to this summary.This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

  3. Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Cellular Classification of Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    The following is a list of ovarian epithelial cancer histologic classifications. Serous cystomas: Serous benign cystadenomas.Serous cystadenomas with proliferating activity of the epithelial cells and nuclear abnormalities but with no infiltrative destructive growth (low potential or borderline malignancy).Serous cystadenocarcinomas.Mucinous cystomas: Mucinous benign cystadenomas.Mucinous cystadenomas with proliferating activity of the epithelial cells and nuclear abnormalities but with no infiltrative destructive growth (low potential or borderline malignancy).Mucinous cystadenocarcinomas.Endometrioid tumors (similar to adenocarcinomas in the endometrium): Endometrioid benign cysts.Endometrioid tumors with proliferating activity of the epithelial cells and nuclear abnormalities but with no infiltrative destructive growth (low malignant potential or borderline malignancy).Endometrioid adenocarcinomas.Clear cell (mesonephroid) tumors: Benign clear cell tumors.Clear cell tumors with

  4. Ovarian Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (09 / 11 / 2014)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Editorial changes were made to this summary.

  5. Ovarian Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Ovarian Cancer

    Ovarian cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ovaries.The ovaries are a pair of organs in the female reproductive system. They are in the pelvis, one on each side of the uterus (the hollow, pear-shaped organ where a fetus grows). Each ovary is about the size and shape of an almond. The ovaries make eggs and female hormones (chemicals that control the way certain cells or organs work in the body).Anatomy of the female reproductive system. The organs in the female reproductive system include the uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes, cervix, and vagina. The uterus has a muscular outer layer called the myometrium and an inner lining called the endometrium. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from cancer of the female reproductive system. Since 1992, the number of new cases of ovarian cancer has stayed about the same. The number of deaths from ovarian cancer has slightly decreased since 2002.It is hard to find ovarian cancer early. Early ovarian cancer may

  6. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Treatment Option Overview

    Standard treatment options for patients with ovarian germ cell tumors include:Surgery.Chemotherapy.Radiation therapy.Patients may be treated with unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy or total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy.All patients except those with stage I, grade I immature teratoma and stage IA dysgerminoma require postoperative chemotherapy. With platinum-based combination chemotherapy, the prognosis for patients with endodermal sinus tumors, immature teratomas, embryonal carcinomas, choriocarcinomas, and mixed tumors containing one or more of these elements has improved dramatically.[1] As new and more effective drugs are developed, many of these patients will be candidates for newer clinical trials.Treatment options under clinical evaluation for patients with ovarian germ cell tumors include:High-dose chemotherapy with bone marrow transplant.New treatment options.References: Gershenson DM, Morris M, Cangir A, et al.: Treatment of malignant germ cell

  7. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Cellular Classification of Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors

    The following histologic subtypes have been described.[1,2]Dysgerminoma.Other germ cell tumors: Endodermal sinus tumor (rare subtypes are hepatoid and intestinal).[1]Embryonal carcinoma.Polyembryoma.Choriocarcinoma.Teratoma: Immature.Mature: Solid.Cystic: Dermoid cyst (mature cystic teratoma).Dermoid cyst with malignant transformation.Monodermal and highly specialized: Struma ovarii.Carcinoid.Struma ovarii and carcinoid.Others (e.g., malignant neuroectodermal and ependymoma).Mixed forms.References: Gershenson DM: Update on malignant ovarian germ cell tumors. Cancer 71 (4 Suppl): 1581-90, 1993. Serov SF, Scully RE, Robin IH: International Histologic Classification of Tumours: No. 9. Histological Typing of Ovarian Tumours. Geneva: World Health Organization, 1973.

  8. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors

    DysgerminomasStandard treatment options:Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without lymphangiography or computed tomography (CT).Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy followed by observation.Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with adjuvant radiation therapy or chemotherapy.For patients with stage I dysgerminoma, unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy conserving the uterus and opposite ovary is accepted treatment of the younger patient who wants to preserve fertility or a pregnancy. Postoperative lymphangiography or CT is indicated before treatment decisions are made for patients who have not had careful surgical and pathological examination of pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes during surgery. (Refer to the PDQ summary on Sexuality and Reproductive Issues for more information on fertility.)Patients who have been completely staged and have stage IA tumors may be observed carefully after surgery without adjuvant treatment. About 15% to 25% of these patients will relapse, but they can be treated

  9. Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options by Stage

    A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some types or stages of cancer, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for you.Stage I and II Ovarian Epithelial CancerTreatment of stage I and stage II ovarian epithelial cancer may include the following:Hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and omentectomy. Lymph nodes and other tissues in the pelvis and abdomen are removed and examined under the microscope to look for cancer cells.Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy may be done in certain women who wish to have children.A clinical trial of internal or external radiation therapy.A clinical trial of chemotherapy.A clinical trial of surgery followed by chemotherapy or watchful waiting (closely monitoring a patient's condition without giving any treatment until symptoms appear or change).A clinical trial of a new treatment.Check for U.S. clinical trials from

  10. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage Information for Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors

    In the absence of obvious metastatic disease, accurate staging of germ cell tumors of the ovary requires laparotomy with careful examination of the following:Entire diaphragm.Both paracolic gutters.Pelvic nodes on the side of the ovarian tumor.The para-aortic lymph nodes.The omentum.The contralateral ovary should be carefully examined and biopsied if necessary. Ascitic fluid should be examined cytologically. If ascites is not present, it is important to obtain peritoneal washings before the tumor is manipulated. In patients with dysgerminoma, lymphangiography or computed tomography is indicated if the pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes were not carefully examined at the time of surgery. Although not required for formal staging, it is desirable to obtain serum levels of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) as soon as the diagnosis is established since persistence of these markers in the serum after surgery indicates unresected tumor.Definitions: FIGOThe

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