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Ovarian Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Ovarian Cancer

  1. Understanding Ovarian Cancer -- Symptoms

    WebMD's guide to symptoms of ovarian cancer.

  2. Understanding Ovarian Cancer -- Diagnosis & Treatment

    WebMD's guide to the diagnosis and treatment of ovarian cancer.

  3. Understanding Ovarian Cancer -- the Basics

    WebMD's guide to the basics of ovarian cancer, including possible causes.

  4. Understanding Ovarian Cancer -- Prevention

    WebMD's guide to preventing ovarian cancer.

  5. Chemotherapy Glossary: What Is My Cancer Doctor Talking About?

    WebMD's chemotherapy glossary explains important chemo terms to help you understand your cancer treatment options.

  6. Chemotherapy for Ovarian Cancer: Help Your Doctor Understand Your Preferences

    Learn more from WebMD about treatment options for ovarian cancer -- and the questions you should ask your doctor before you start.

  7. 14 FAQs About Chemotherapy for Ovarian Cancer

    If you’ve been diagnosed with ovarian cancer, find answers from WebMD to your most frequently asked questions about treatment and its side effects.

  8. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options By Stage

    A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some types or stages of cancer, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for you.Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell TumorsTreatment depends on whether the tumor is a dysgerminoma or another type of ovarian germ cell tumor. Treatment of dysgerminoma may include the following: Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without lymphangiography or CT scan.Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy followed by observation.Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy followed by radiation therapy.Unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy followed by chemotherapy.Treatment of other ovarian germ cell tumors may be either: unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy followed by careful observation; orunilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, sometimes followed by combination chemotherapy.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting

  9. Ovarian Cancer Screening (PDQ®): Screening - Patient Information [NCI] - General Information About Ovarian Cancer

    Ovarian cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the ovaries.The ovaries are a pair of organs in the female reproductive system. They are located in the pelvis, one on each side of the uterus (the hollow, pear-shaped organ where a fetus grows). Each ovary is about the size and shape of an almond. The ovaries produce eggs and female hormones (chemicals that control the way certain cells or organs function).Anatomy of the female reproductive system. The organs in the female reproductive system include the uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes, cervix, and vagina. The uterus has a muscular outer layer called the myometrium and an inner lining called the endometrium. See the following PDQ summaries for more information about ovarian cancer:Ovarian Cancer PreventionGenetics of Breast and Ovarian CancerOvarian Epithelial Cancer TreatmentOvarian Germ Cell Tumors TreatmentOvarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors TreatmentIn the United States, ovarian cancer is the

  10. Ovarian Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Significance

    Incidence and Mortality In 2013, it is estimated that 22,240 new cases of ovarian cancer will be diagnosed and 14,030 deaths due to ovarian cancer will occur. Incidence rates have been relatively stable since 1992. Death rates for ovarian cancer decreased by 2.0% per year from 2005 to 2009.[1]For the general population of women, the lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer is 1.39%; the lifetime risk of dying from ovarian cancer is 1.04%.[2] Some women are at an increased risk due to an inherited susceptibility to ovarian cancer with the magnitude of that risk depending on the affected gene and specific mutation. Underlying ovarian cancer risk can be assessed through accurate pedigrees and/or genetic markers of risk. Because of uncertainties about cancer risks associated with specific gene mutations, genetic information may be difficult to interpret outside of families with a high incidence of ovarian cancer. Three inherited ovarian cancer susceptibility syndromes have been

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