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Ovarian Cancer Health Center

Medical Reference Related to Ovarian Cancer

  1. Ovarian Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - Get More Information From NCI

    Call 1-800-4-CANCERFor more information, U.S. residents may call the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Cancer Information Service toll-free at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., Eastern Time. A trained Cancer Information Specialist is available to answer your questions.Chat online The NCI's LiveHelp® online chat service provides Internet users with the ability to chat online with an Information Specialist. The service is available from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Eastern time, Monday through Friday. Information Specialists can help Internet users find information on NCI Web sites and answer questions about cancer. Write to usFor more information from the NCI, please write to this address:NCI Public Inquiries Office9609 Medical Center Dr. Room 2E532 MSC 9760Bethesda, MD 20892-9760Search the NCI Web siteThe NCI Web site provides online access to information on cancer, clinical trials, and other Web sites and organizations that offer support

  2. Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - Treatment Options for Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors

    A link to a list of current clinical trials is included for each treatment section. For some stages, there may not be any trials listed. Check with your doctor for clinical trials that are not listed here but may be right for you.Early Stage Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors (Stage I and II)Surgery is the standard treatment for early stage ovarian low malignant potential tumor. The type of surgery usually depends on whether a woman plans to have children.For women who plan to have children, surgery is either:unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy; orpartial oophorectomy.To prevent recurrence of disease, most doctors recommend surgery to remove the remaining ovarian tissue when a woman no longer plans to have children.For women who do not plan to have children, treatment may be hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy.Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with stage I borderline ovarian surface epithelial-stromal

  3. Ovarian Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Who Is at Risk?

    Ovarian cancer is rare. The incidence rate for ovarian cancer between 2006 and 2010 was 12.5 cases per 100,000 women.[1] Women with a family history of ovarian cancer are at increased risk, and those with an inherited predisposition to ovarian cancer, such as a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, have a very high risk of developing ovarian cancer (refer to the Lynch syndrome section in the PDQ summary on Genetics of Breast and Ovarian Cancer for more information). Other risk factors for ovarian cancer include obesity, nulliparity and use of postmenopausal hormone therapy, fertility drugs, and perineal talc. Factors associated with a decreased risk of ovarian cancer include use of oral contraceptives, multiple pregnancies, breast-feeding, and tubal ligation.[2,3,4,5]References: Howlader N, Noone AM, Krapcho M, et al., eds.: SEER Cancer Statistics Review, 1975-2010. Bethesda, Md: National Cancer Institute, based on November 2012 SEER data submission, posted to the SEER web site, April 2013. Also

  4. Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - To Learn More About Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    For more information from the National Cancer Institute about ovarian epithelial cancer, see the following:Ovarian Cancer Home PageWhat You Need to Know About™ Ovarian CancerOvarian Cancer PreventionOvarian Cancer ScreeningUnusual Cancers of ChildhoodDrugs Approved for Ovarian CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: Targeted Therapies (Advances in Targeted Therapies)Targeted Cancer TherapiesBRCA1 and BRCA2: Cancer Risk and Genetic TestingGenetic Testing for Hereditary Cancer SyndromesFor general cancer information and other resources from the National Cancer Institute, see the following:What You Need to Know About™ CancerUnderstanding Cancer Series: CancerCancer StagingChemotherapy and You: Support for People With CancerRadiation Therapy and You: Support for People With CancerCoping with Cancer: Supportive and Palliative CareQuestions to Ask Your Doctor About CancerCancer LibraryInformation For Survivors/Caregivers/Advocates

  5. Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062829-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Treatment

  6. Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Stage I and Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer Treatment

    Treatment options:If the tumor is well differentiated or moderately well differentiated, surgery alone may be adequate treatment for patients with stage IA and IB disease. Surgery should include hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and omentectomy. Additionally, the undersurface of the diaphragm should be visualized and biopsied; pelvic and abdominal peritoneal biopsies and pelvic and para-aortic lymph node biopsies are required and peritoneal washings should be obtained routinely.[1] In selected patients who desire childbearing and have grade I tumors, unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy may be associated with a low risk of recurrence.[2]If the tumor is grade III, densely adherent, or stage IC, the chance of relapse and death from ovarian cancer is as much as 30%.[3,4,5,6] Clinical trials evaluating the following treatment approaches have been performed:Intraperitoneal P-32 or radiation therapy.[1,7,8]Systemic chemotherapy based on platinums alone or in combination with

  7. Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062941-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Treatment

  8. Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Health Professional Information [NCI] - Changes to This Summary (07 / 09 / 2012)

    The PDQ cancer information summaries are reviewed regularly and updated as new information becomes available. This section describes the latest changes made to this summary as of the date above.Stage Information for Ovarian Low Malignant Potential Tumors Updated staging information for 2010 (cited FIGO Committee on Gynecologic Oncology and Edge et al. as references 1 and 2, respectively).This summary is written and maintained by the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board, which is editorially independent of NCI. The summary reflects an independent review of the literature and does not represent a policy statement of NCI or NIH. More information about summary policies and the role of the PDQ Editorial Boards in maintaining the PDQ summaries can be found on the About This PDQ Summary and PDQ NCI's Comprehensive Cancer Database pages.

  9. Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®): Treatment - Patient Information [NCI] - nci_ncicdr0000062967-nci-header

    This information is produced and provided by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The information in this topic may have changed since it was written. For the most current information, contact the National Cancer Institute via the Internet web site at http://cancer.gov or call 1-800-4-CANCER.Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Treatment

  10. Ovarian Cancer Prevention (PDQ®): Prevention - Patient Information [NCI] - About This PDQ Summary

    About PDQPhysician Data Query (PDQ) is the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) comprehensive cancer information database. The PDQ database contains summaries of the latest published information on cancer prevention, detection, genetics, treatment, supportive care, and complementary and alternative medicine. Most summaries come in two versions. The health professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to-understand, nontechnical language. Both versions have cancer information that is accurate and up to date and most versions are also available in Spanish.PDQ is a service of the NCI. The NCI is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH is the federal government's center of biomedical research. The PDQ summaries are based on an independent review of the medical literature. They are not policy statements of the NCI or the NIH.Purpose of This SummaryThis PDQ cancer information summary has current

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