Consider TENS

Consider TENS

Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a treatment that may help to reduce pain. Find out what TENS is, where and how to have TENS treatments, and how it might help you.

Conditions: Osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, migraine, neck pain, nerve pain, undiagnosed

Symptoms: Burning, deep pain, electric pain, headache, joint pain, joint tenderness, muscle pain, nerve pain, pain, pain with movement, buttock pain, hip pain, neck pain, shoulder pain, upper back pain, sharp pain, shocking pain, shooting pain, stabbing pain, muscle spasms, tingling, pins and needles,  arm cramping, leg cramping, all over pain, arm pain, foot pain

Triggers: Uncontrolled diabetes, high blood sugar, sports injury, injury, workplace injury, repetitive motions

Treatments: Gabapentin, Fanatrex, Gabarone, Gralise, Horizant, Neurontin,  lidocaine patch, Cymbalta, duloxetine, ibuprofen, naproxen, physical therapy

Categories: Treatment

Duration

7

Intro to TENS

TENS uses electrical stimulation of nerves to block the pain signals to the brain. Stimulating the nerves may also help the body produce natural painkillers called endorphins.  

Prompt: What Is TENS?

CTA: How does it ease pain?

Conditions: Osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, migraine, neck pain, nerve pain, undiagnosed

Symptoms: Burning, deep pain, electric pain, headache, joint pain, joint tenderness, muscle pain, nerve pain, pain, pain with movement, buttock pain, hip pain, lower back pain, neck pain, shoulder pain, upper back pain, sharp pain, shocking pain, shooting pain, stabbing pain, muscle spasms, tingling, pins and needles, arm cramping, leg cramping, all over pain, arm pain, foot pain

Triggers: Uncontrolled diabetes, high blood sugar, sports injury, injury, workplace injury, repetitive motions

Treatments: Gabapentin, Fanatrex, Gabarone, Gralise, Horizant, Neurontin,  lidocaine patch, Cymbalta, duloxetine, ibuprofen, naproxen, physical therapy

Categories: Treatment

TENS Treatment

A TENS unit is a small battery-operated device that can be hooked to a belt. Two electrodes carry a low-level, painless electric current from the TENS machine to the skin. This produces a slight tingling sensation. A TENS session usually lasts 30-60 minutes. It can be repeated as needed to ease pain.

Prompt: Tingling TENS.

CTA: Find out what it's like.

Conditions: Osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, migraine, neck pain, nerve pain, undiagnosed

Symptoms: Burning, deep pain, electric pain, headache, joint pain, joint tenderness, muscle pain, nerve pain, pain, pain with movement, buttock pain, hip pain, lower back pain, neck pain, shoulder pain, upper back pain, sharp pain, shocking pain, shooting pain, stabbing pain, muscle spasms, tingling, pins and needles, arm cramping, leg cramping, all over pain, arm pain, foot pain

Triggers: Uncontrolled diabetes, high blood sugar, sports injury, injury, workplace injury, repetitive motions

Treatments: Gabapentin, Fanatrex, Gabarone, Gralise, Horizant, Neurontin, lidocaine patch, Cymbalta, duloxetine, ibuprofen, naproxen,  physical therapy

Categories: Treatment

Is TENS for You?

There is some controversy about the effectiveness of TENS in the treatment of chronic pain. TENS appears to be most effective for nerve pain. And several studies have confirmed its effectiveness for postoperative pain, osteoarthritis, and chronic musculoskeletal pain. Some also use it for headaches.

Prompt: Is TENS for you?

CTA: What are its benefits?

Conditions: Osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, migraine, neck pain, nerve pain, undiagnosed

Symptoms: Burning, deep pain, electric pain, headache, joint pain, joint tenderness, muscle pain, nerve pain, pain, pain with movement, buttock pain, hip pain, lower back pain, neck pain, shoulder pain, upper back pain, sharp pain, shocking pain, shooting pain, stabbing pain, muscle spasms, tingling, pins and needles, arm cramping, leg cramping, all over pain, arm pain, foot pain

Triggers: Uncontrolled diabetes, high blood sugar, sports injury, injury, workplace injury, repetitive motions

Treatments: Gabapentin, Fanatrex, Gabarone, Gralise, Horizant, Neurontin, lidocaine patch, Cymbalta, duloxetine, ibuprofen, naproxen, physical therapy

Categories: Treatment

Finding TENS

Ask your doctor whether TENS might be effective for your type of pain. If so, your doctor may be able to refer you to a physical therapist or other medical practitioner who uses TENS. Or your doctor may write a prescription for a portable TENS unit you can use at home. 

Prompt: TENS lookout.

CTA: Learn how to find TENS treatments.

Conditions: Osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, migraine, neck pain, nerve pain, undiagnosed

Symptoms: Burning, deep pain, electric pain, headache, joint pain, joint tenderness, muscle pain, nerve pain, pain, pain with movement, buttock pain, hip pain, lower back pain, neck pain, shoulder pain, upper back pain, sharp pain, shocking pain, shooting pain, stabbing pain, muscle spasms, tingling, pins and needles, arm cramping, leg cramping, all over pain, arm pain, foot pain  

Triggers: Uncontrolled diabetes, high blood sugar, sports injury, injury, workplace injury, repetitive motions

Treatments: Gabapentin, Fanatrex, Gabarone, Gralise, Horizant, Neurontin, lidocaine patch, Cymbalta, duloxetine, ibuprofen, naproxen, physical therapy

Categories: Treatment

WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, DO, MS on February 10, 2016

Sources

SOURCES:

American Cancer Society: "Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation."

Jason Theodoskais, MD, MPH, author, The Arthritis Cure; preventive and sports medicine specialist, University of Arizona Medical Center.

NYU: "Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)."

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center: "Nonsurgical Treatments for Spine Conditions."

Walnut Creek Chiropractic: "BV Medical Back Pain Relief TENS Support Belt."

The Cochrane Collaboration: "Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) versus placebo for chronic low-back Pain."

The Ohio State University Medical Center: "TENS (Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation)."

Johnson, M. Pain, 2006.

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