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Understanding Breakthrough Pain and Flares

By Jim Brown
WebMD Feature

Breakthrough pain (BTP) is a fact of life for many cancer patients. But pain experts are now finding that these sudden, temporary flares of severe pain can affect people with noncancerous conditions as well.

“We are much better now at identifying breakthrough pain, partly because the government requires that we ask if a patient is in pain,” says Naum Shaparin, MD. Shaparin is a pain management specialist at New Jersey Medical School. “Before this ‘fifth vital sign’ became the norm, patients with pain were often missed because the question wasn’t asked.”

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And new research confirms that breakthrough pain is common among noncancer patients. A recent study published in the Journal of Opioid Management found that breakthrough pain was more common in patients without cancer than among those with the disease. And the noncancer patients were more impaired than those with cancer.

Breakthrough pain -- often called “flares” by doctors or “flare-ups” by patients -- is serious enough to upset the lives of people who are already trying to control chronic pain with one or more drugs. BTP is not new pain. It is a more severe episode of the background pain that already exists.

By the Numbers

Findings taken from an American Pain Foundation (APF) survey of cancer-pain patients regarding breakthrough cancer pain confirm that numbers tell the story:

  • More than 80% say that BTP affects the quality of their lives, including their desire to participate in certain activities.
  • More than 70% say that BTP affects their relationships with family members and their ability to perform everyday chores.
  • More than 50% say that BTP has increased their daily medical expenses.

While there aren’t as many hard statistics on noncancer BTP, an increasing body of evidence links it with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, migraine headaches, nerve pain, low back pain, shingles, fibromyalgia, and diabetic neuropathy. The list continues to grow.

Why, When, How Often, and How Long

Different things trigger BTP for different people. Sometimes, it just happens for no particular reason. At other times, individuals get flares during certain activities like exercising, coughing, moving after surgery, going to the bathroom, or even during a simple act like dressing.

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