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    Palliative Care Center

    Features Related to Palliative Care

    1. Palliative Care and Quality of Life

      "Palliative care" means care that makes you feel better but doesn’t treat your disease. It's a term often linked to late-stage illness and hospice care. And while it can ease the way for people in the later stages of cancer, it’s something you should think about no matter what your diagnosis is. The

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    2. Caregiver Care: Managing Stress, Depression

      Whether you are providing palliative care for someone with a painful chronic condition or for someone actively dying, the rewards that come with caregiving are real and varied. According to a study at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, most caregivers say they developed a better relationship

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    3. What Is Palliative Care?

      Since Kathleen Huggins was diagnosed with lung cancer last November, doctors have been working hard to try to cure her. Surgeons removed part of her lung, and soon she'll begin chemotherapy. But the 56-year-old New York City resident also benefits from a new type of medical specialty called palliati

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    4. Advance Directives: Having the Talk

      Imagine that your elderly father's emphysema has worsened dramatically. You're worried. If he becomes too ill to breathe on his own, what would he want for himself? How much should doctors intervene? If he's not able to make his own medical decisions, who would he want to speak on his behalf? You're

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    5. The Palliative Caregiver

      No matter when you get the news that a loved one has a painful or terminal condition, it's a shock. Deciding to become their caregiver, to help them manage their pain and suffering -- or manage it for them -- is a difficult choice. That choice may be made in the blink of an eye, particularly when a

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    6. Pediatric Palliative Care: Easing Your Child's Suffering

      Karen Zrenda remembers the first time she took her newborn son Tommy outside. Tommy's respiratory defect had kept him at Yale-New Haven Children's Hospital for nearly the first year of his life. The sun shined on him for the first time. "It seemed like such a normal thing, but it was so exciting. It

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    7. Coping With a Life-Threatening Illness

      "I'm sorry, but there's nothing more we can do." No patient wants to hear that. No doctor wants to say it. And with good reason: It isn't true. It is true that in the course of many illnesses, cure ceases to be an option. But no hope of a sure cure does not mean no hope at all. It certainly does not

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