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Palliative Care Center

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Talking About End-of-Life Care Doesn't Raise Death Risk

Study Shows People Who Prepare Advance Directives Don't Die Sooner
By
WebMD Health News
Reviewed by Laura J. Martin, MD

Sept. 28, 2011 -- Talking about end-of-life care and having advance directives doesn't make death come any more quickly, according to a new study.

Advance directives are legal documents that allow you to record your wishes concerning medical care in the event that you become incapacitated and are unable to speak for yourself.

The study shows that talking with a doctor about end-of-life decisions or having an advance directive did not affect survival rates in a group of 356 people admitted to three different hospitals.

Those who had these discussions with their health care provider or had advance directives in their record were no more likely to die in the following year than those who did not.

The study is published in the Journal of Hospital Medicine.

Researchers say the findings are "reassuring" and contradict the notion that advance directives translate to less aggressive care or cause harm.

"With advance directives, one is allowed to choose the most aggressive measures if that's what matches their goals and values," says researcher Stacy Fischer, MD, assistant professor at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora. "It's not anyone else deciding, it's you deciding."

Debate Over End-of-Life Care

The researchers say the term "death panels" has sparked controversy in recent years and undermined the efforts of health care providers who provide end-of-life care. They say the term scares people into thinking that their lives might be cut short for their families' or society's best interest.

The term "death panels" was coined in 2009 to describe the provision in the Obama administration's Affordable Care Act that would require Medicare to pay for advance care planning and end-of-life counseling.

David Goodman, MD, professor of pediatrics and health policy at Dartmouth College, says the term "death panels" has become politicized as an unethical form of rationing care.

"It is simply a matter of matching the patient's goals and values to the care that they receive when they are no longer able to express their own wishes," Goodman tells WebMD.

Discussing Advance Directives

In the study, researchers looked at the effect of having a discussion about advance directives or having an advance directive in the medical record on the risk of dying within a year of being admitted to one of three Colorado hospitals.

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