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Baby Development: Your 7-Month-Old

At seven months, your baby is becoming independent and developing his own unique personality. From picking up a favorite toy to scooting or crawling from place to place -- your 7-month-old is learning how to control his environment and finding out that being in control can be fun. During this next month, you should find plenty of opportunities to continue encouraging your baby’s mobility, creativity, and curiosity -- in safe ways, of course.

In this portion of WebMD’s month-by-month guide, discover what baby milestones you can expect your child to achieve in the seventh month.

Baby Month by Month

Girl and Boy Baby
Your baby's first year will be full of joys and challenges. WebMD pediatrician Steven Parker, MD, explains what you can expect as your baby grows and develops.

Seventh Month Baby Milestones: Motor Skills

Seven-month-olds are learning to get around, although they don’t all do it in the same way. Your baby may creep, scoot, roll, crawl, or combine all four movements. You can encourage this new mobility by placing toys just out of your baby’s reach. Make sure baby is safe while exploring by putting away any toys or other objects that contain small or sharp pieces.

Because your baby can now sit unassisted and reach for and pick up toys, playtime involves a lot more independence than in months past. The ability to hold and drink from a cup, and possibly eat from a spoon, means that baby is also more independent at mealtimes.

Your 7-month-old should be strong enough now to hold himself up on his legs while supported. Practicing this skill will strengthen the muscles of your baby’s legs and help him get ready for walking.

Seventh Month Baby Milestones: Teething

Between your baby’s fifth and seventh month, you should see those first tiny tooth buds emerge from the gums. You’ll know your baby is teething because he’ll drool more and will probably be fussier than usual. To soothe gum discomfort, give your baby a cold washcloth or teething toy to chew on. The FDA advises against using topical pain relievers rubbed on the gums because of the potential for dangerous side effects. 

Once the first few teeth have popped up, brush them daily with a soft baby toothbrush and water or a toddler toothpaste that is fluoride free. Hold off on the toothpaste with fluoride until your child is old enough to know not to swallow it, which will be around age 2.

You’ll probably see the bottom middle two teeth pop up first, followed by the two top middle teeth. The bottom and top two side teeth should fill in over the next three or four months. Don’t be alarmed if your baby is 7 months old and doesn’t have any teeth yet. Teething patterns can vary widely from child to child. A few babies are born with teeth, while other babies don’t start teething until they are over a year old.

WebMD Medical Reference

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