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    Move Over, Mom and Dad

    Can Co-sleeping Work For Your Family?

    The Family Bed Safety Checklist continued...

    But many pediatricians, breast-feeding advocates and others harshly criticized the results, claiming the study was unreliable in large part because it didn't sufficiently consider underlying causes for the deaths or compare like statistics for babies who slept in cribs.

    If you do want to share their bed with your children, pediatric experts recommend these safety precautions:

    • Make sure your young baby sleeps on his back on a firm surface and avoid placing him on top of soft, fluffy mattresses, waterbeds or comforters and quilts. One of the major risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is putting babies to sleep on their stomachs, especially on soft bedding or waterbeds.
    • To avoid the risk of rolling onto your baby, never share a bed with any infant or young child if you're intoxicated or on prescription or over-the-counter medications that could interfere with your ability to awaken easily, such as antidepressants, sleeping pills and some antihistamines. Obesity is another risk factor for rollover accidents. If you are a smoker, you probably shouldn't share a bed with your baby, because infants of smokers are at increased risk of SIDS and childhood respiratory illnesses.
    • Prevent your baby from falling off the bed by placing her between mom and a guardrail, or between both parents. In "The Baby Book" (Little, Brown and Company, 1993), Dr. Sears advises against the latter, saying fathers don't exhibit the same keen awareness of a baby's presence while asleep.
    • Make sure the headboard and footboard don't have openings in which a baby's head or limbs could get caught.

    Bedside Breast-feeding

    One of the benefits of sleeping with your baby is that it's much easier to handle nighttime feedings if you don't have to drag yourself out of bed to rescue a hungry infant.

    "We planned not to sleep with the baby," says Jessica Huff, a mother of two from New York, "but within a week the baby was in the bed -- it was just so much easier." The choice between getting up to sit in a chair and nurse or rolling over to do it was a no-brainer, she says.

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