Skip to content

    Health & Baby

    Medical Reference Related to Baby Center

    1. Necrotizing Enterocolitis - Frequently Asked Questions

      Learning about necrotizing enterocolitis: What is necrotizing enterocolitis? Who gets it? What increases my child's risk? How can I prevent it? Getting treatment: How can I care for my child's ostomy? ...

    2. Growth and Development, Ages 1 to 12 Months - Taking Care of Yourselves

      If your premature infant is moved to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), expect that you will become overwhelmed with new emotions and information. Don't be surprised if you and your partner handle this crisis differently, which may or may not create a strain on your relationship. Both of you, in different ways, may feel: Fearful and helpless.Grief. Separation from your infant at birth is a .

    3. Circumcision: Mogen Clamp - When to Call a Doctor

      Call your doctor immediately if you notice anything that concerns you. You are the expert on your baby. Although usually everything is fine, do not be afraid to contact your health professional for any reason. Physical problems to watch for in your newborn include: An umbilical cord stump that looks infected, as is indicated by pus or reddened skin at the base of the cord.Signs of dehydration, ...

    4. Health and Safety, Birth to 2 Years - Healthy Habits for Preventing Infection and Illness

      The immune systems of babies and young children up to 24 months of age are still developing. This makes them especially prone to getting sick after being exposed to viruses and bacteria. Exposure to common pathogens can occur from person - to - person contact and improperly prepared food. Good hygiene practices can help you to protect your child from exposure to these germs. Safe food preparationY

    5. Growth and Development, Ages 1 to 12 Months - Topic Overview

      In the first month,your doctor will pay close attention to your baby's increasing weight,length,and head circumference,which is measured around the largest point of the head,usually starting at a point on the forehead. The average birth weight for babies is around 7.5 lb (3.4 kg),although between 5.5 lb (2.5 kg) and 10 lb (4.5 kg) is considered normal. In general: Boys are usually a ...

    6. Cleaning Your Young Son's Natural (Uncircumcised) Penis - Health Tools

      Health Tools help you make wise health decisions or take action to improve your health. Actionsets are designed to help people take an active role in managing a health condition. Fitness: Staying active when you have young children ...

    7. Spitting Up - Frequently Asked Questions

      Learning about cleft palate: What is cleft palate? How common is it? Can it be prevented during pregnancy? How are cleft lip and cleft palate related? Being diagnosed: What kind of physical exam is given? What are the different classifications of cleft palate? What are some common concerns parents have? Getting treatment: Besides surgery,what other treatment will my child need? Which health ...

    8. Bottle-Feeding - Topic Overview

      What is necrotizing enterocolitis? Necrotizing enterocolitis is infection and inflammation of the intestine. It is most common in babies who are born early (premature). Many newborns who have it go on to live healthy lives. But if the infection becomes severe,it can cause severe damage to the intestine,which can be deadly. Some children may have ongoing problems with digestion,growth,or ...

    9. Growth and Development, Ages 1 to 12 Months - Topic Overview

      The challenges of caring for a newborn intensify if your baby is very fussy or cries a lot. Relationships can become strained between parents and baby; between parents; and between parents and other family members,especially other caregivers. Older brothers and sisters may feel resentful,ignored,helpless,or sometimes even guilty because of a vague sense that they are to blame for the baby's ...

    10. Bottle-Feeding: Disadvantages for Babies - Topic Overview

      If your premature infant was born before the gestational age of 32 to 34 weeks, he or she cannot feed by mouth. This is because of:Poor coordination (or lack) of sucking, swallowing, and gag reflex.Weakness of both the oral and stomach muscles.Small stomach capacity.Until your infant becomes stronger and more mature, tube feeding is used to feed milk, formula, or a combination of the two directly into the stomach. For the infant whose gastrointestinal tract cannot yet digest properly or is affected by necrotizing enterocolitis, intravenous (parenteral) feedings are given through a tube into the umbilical site (umbilical catheter) or into a vein.When your infant is mature enough to feed from a nipple, oral feedings are introduced. Over a period of days or weeks, you can gradually replace more tube or IV feedings with breast-feedings.Premature infants, including those born at 34 to almost 37 weeks, often have trouble with oral feedings and may need extra help.In some cases, doctors

    Displaying 241 - 250 of 429 Articles << Prev Page 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Next >>

    Today on WebMD

    mother on phone holding baby
    When you should call 911.
    parents and baby
    Unexpected ways your life will change.
     
    baby acne
    What’s normal – and what’s not.
    baby asleep on moms shoulder
    Help your baby get the sleep he needs.
     

    mother holding baby at night
    ARTICLE
    mother with sick child
    QUIZ
     
    Chinese mother breast feeding newborn baby girl
    SLIDESHOW
    Track Your Babys Vaccines
    TOOL
     
    Baby Napping 10 Dos And Donts
    Slideshow
    Mother with her baby boy
    Article
     
    baby in crib
    Slideshow
    baby gear slideshow
    Slideshow